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Home arrow Law arrow United States law and policy on transitional justice : principles, politics, and pragmatics
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Lustration

The Allied Powers adopted a lustration policy, which MacArthur administered as the SCAP, purging the principal Japanese war criminals, at least temporarily, from public office. The Class A war criminals not prosecuted were not permitted to immediately serve again in government.116 Some Japanese implicated in or convicted of atrocities, however, would later return to public life, even rising to prominent senior political roles. For example, Mamoru Shigemitsu, whom the IMTFE had convicted on six counts and sentenced to seven years imprisonment,117 was appointed Japanese foreign minister in 1954.118 In addition, Nobusuke Kishi, an unindicted Class A war criminal, became prime minister in 1957.119 The USG later would collaborate with many of these convicted or suspected war criminals in efforts to combat communism.120 That the USG “embraced many erstwhile war criminals in the common cause of anticommunism,” Dower states, “gave a perverse binational coloration to this repudiation of the [IMTFE’s] verdict.”121

 
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