Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Law arrow United States law and policy on transitional justice : principles, politics, and pragmatics
Source

C. LOWER-LEVEL JAPANESE WAR CRIMINALS

The USG and some other Allies seriously considered and implemented at least five transitional justice options for addressing Japanese suspected of committing lesser atrocities: (1) prosecution in U.S. military tribunals, (2) appeal in a U.S. civilian court, (3) prosecution in military courts established by other states, (4) de facto conditional amnesty, and (5) lustration. Those Japanese whom the USG and its allies decided to hold accountable were prosecuted through unilateral, ad hoc Allied military tribunals (options 1 and 3). Some of those cases were (unsuccessfully) appealed to the USG’s permanent domestic federal judiciary, including the U.S. Supreme Court (option 2). Many of these and other Japanese Classes B and C war criminals also were the targets of lustration (option 5). Others whom the USG did not hold accountable, including several thousand Japanese involved in medical experimentation, were effectively provided de facto conditional amnesty (option 4) because the USG presumably would have revoked immunity had they not cooperated.

 
Source
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Political science
Philosophy
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel