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Notes

  • 1. Igal is a pseudonym. My interview with Igal took place entirely in Hebrew, though in the interest of space I only provide English translations here. The translation of this quote, like all other translations in the chapter, is my own.
  • 2. For the purposes of my discussion here, I abstract away from the difference between creak (sometimes also called glottal fry), characterized by maximal adduction of the vocal folds, and creaky voice, a compound phonation type derived from the combination of creak and modal voicing (see Laver 1980, 1994). While there are important phonetic differences between the two, they are tangential to my arguments here and so I use the terms creaky voice and creak interchangeably.
  • 3. I had originally hoped to solicit participation from a network of Orthodox Jewish women and men who engage in same-sex practice, but this ultimately proved to be impossible. My interview with Igal can thus serve as no more than a case study of individuals in that situation.
  • 4. If an instance of creak began in a nonfinal syllable and continued to final position (in a multisyllabic word, for example), all syllables were coded as “final.”
  • 5. Transcription conventions are as follows:

.?, Intonation contour

::: Vowel lengthening

  • (.) Short pause (less than 0.5 seconds)
  • (1) Numbers of seconds of pause = latching (no audible break between speakers)
  • - speaker abruptly stopping (()) transcriber comments word Speech in English
 
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