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Home arrow Psychology arrow The Wiley Blackwell handbook of the psychology of recruitment, selection and employee retention
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Future Research

Expanding the understanding of teams

‘What is a team?’ In today’s world, new types of team are emerging at a rapid pace. The changing nature of teams raises a series of questions regarding team membership (e.g., frequently changing membership), task and relational interdependence (e.g., ambiguity in task interdependence) and team effectiveness (e.g., performance standards by multiple shareholders; Wageman, Gardner & Mortensen, 2012), all of which are essential to team assessment and selection. In order to support evidence-based practice, team researchers can adopt different definitional elements of team components (e.g., team members, leaders, stakeholders) and explore the validity of KSAOs in different types of collaborations.

TTA

TTA plays a crucial role in team assessment and selection, yet there are many unanswered questions regarding the validity of different TTA approaches. Organizational researchers and practitioners have commonly adopted individual-based task analyses that might be inappropriate for team selection, which heightens the need to further develop and validate more team-based TTA that encompasses contextual factors and multilevel principles. Despite the existence of many commonly endorsed TTA approaches, the field lacks a single taxonomy to organize and explain various approaches of TTA to provide a common guideline for conducting TTA across time and situation (Bennett, Alliger, Wilson & Gibson, 2012). Gaps in the literature call for the development of a comprehensive guideline for conducting individual- and team-based TTA. In addition, efforts are needed to validate existing types of team-based TTA that have yet to be tested and develop new tools and methods for conducting TTA.

 
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