THE POLITICAL IMPLEMENTATION OF BCAS IN THE CONTEXT OF ENERGY TRANSITION

The objectives stated in the COP21 agreement—that is, capping at 1.5°C-2°C the global temperature increase, as well as the reference to carbon neutrality— seem vague since no specific emissions reduction targets have been agreed upon by the Parties to respond to the urgency in limiting global warming. The only measure which can be viewed as relatively constraining are the ‘Intended Nationally Determined Contributions’ (INDCs).

Consequently, the implementation of BCAs remains an effective tool for countries ready to implement, or having already committed to, a bold energy transition. BCAs can level the environmental commitment (INDC) among countries facing similar responsibilities in climate change. Moreover, a well- designed BCA should aim at answering the concerns of developed countries while promoting growth in developing countries, and should be complemented by sobriety policies.[1]

  • [1] Referring to the principle of primary energy consumption reduction by using less of anenergy service, also called energy sparing, ‘sustainable lifestyles and sustainable patterns ofconsumption and production’ (COP21 Paris Agreement, Preamble), behavioural change, energysaving, energy soberness, energy sobriety, and so on. The authors have chosen to use ‘sobriety’ in
 
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