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Crime Mapping and Administrative Crime Analysis

As Santos (2013) points out, crime mapping (which was discussed in Chapter 12) is useful in all forms of crime analysis. It does, in fact, play an important role in administrative crime analysis, as it often helps to convey essential information to the media and the public. A police department could—as many police agencies these days do— post maps on their website to show areas of crime.

Using geographic information system technology, the crime analyst can not only transform information into actionable intelligence, but also educate the public with visual information to clarify crime concerns and enlist community action.

Using the Internet

Like the rest of society, police departments must make use of the Internet and social media these days to communicate with the community. While there may be some disadvantages to using the Internet to communicate with the public (it is impersonal and requires resources to keep updated), the benefits, many police departments have decided, outweigh any potential drawbacks.

Police departments, with presentations developed by crime analysts, can do much to communicate important information to citizens. This kind of information dissemination can include lists or maps of criminal activities in particular neighborhoods, recommendations for public safety, current or ongoing dangerous situations, or emergency alerts.

Below is an example of an administrative crime analysis report. This report was prepared for the administration of a police department that wanted more information about the use of tasers by the officers in the department in order to properly respond to questions from the city council about taser usage.

Administrative Analysis report Taser usage Example of an administrative crime analysis report:

The center studied data regarding Taser Usage, To Include;

  • • The ratio of Taser deployments to Tasers in service
  • • Level of resistance by the subject,
  • • Areas of the body hit
  • • Hospitalization of subjects * •

Data and Methods:

To accomplish the analysis, data was drawn from two sources.

• Internal Affairs reports related to subject resistance reports

The original Subject Resistance Reports logged into the RMS system

Also included is the number of Tasers that were in service, and their issued dates.

Tasers in service, and Taser deployments per year:

Table 1: Tasers in Service by Year

Year

TASER

model

Number in service

2015

X2

218

2014

X2

235

2013

X2

82

2012

X26

90

2011

X26

80

2010

X26

68

2009

M26 X26

60

2008

M26

48

2007

M26

59

2006

M26

58

2005

M26

48

2004

M26

35

2003

M26

35

Type of subject action:

Table 2: Subject Resistance Actions

No

Yes

Verbal

13.1%

86.9%

Passive

81.5%

18.5%

Active

5.6%

94.4%

Armed

81.1%

18.9%

Area of the body in which subjects were hit:

The front torso was the most common area of the body hit by Taser deployments. Table 3: Location of Taser strikes on subjects, if any

No

Yes

Upper limb

90.0%

2.2%

Lower limb

69.0%

18.6%

Back torso

47.3%

38.2%

Front torso

44.3%

35.2%

Missed subject

89.0%

4.5%

Taser use was threatened

89.0%

1.6%

Hospitalization:

Table 4: Hospitalization, compared to injuries suffered during the SRR. Note, all persons injured were either admitted to the hospital, treated and released, or refused treatment (with one unknown and one deceased).

Not injured

Injured

Admitted to hospital

39

45

Deceased

0

2

N/A

0

0

Not Treated

22

0

Refused

15

8

Treated & released by hospital

168

128

Unknown

6

5

Totals

250

188

This administrative crime analysis reports provides information about taser usage by police officers which may help lead to administrative policy decisions.

Next Chapter

In Chapter 15, you will learn about a final type of crime analysis: operations crime analysis.

 
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