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Sleep Survey Development and Administration to Servicemembers in the Deployment Life Study

This section provides an overview of the RAND Deployment Life Study—including the study's design and measures—and details on how we created and administered the sleep survey for inclusion in the Deployment Life Study.

Deployment Life Study Overview

The Deployment Life Study (see Tanielian et al., 2014) was designed to identify the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of family readiness across the three phases of a deployment cycle: pre-deployment, deployment, and post-deployment. The sample included servicemembers eligible for deployment within the next six to 12 months, their spouses, and children under 18 (if available); for details on the sampling methods, recruiting strategies, and incentives for study participation, see Tanielian et al. (2014). Briefly, rolling recruitment and administration of the baseline assessment began in March 2011 for the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps samples and in November 2012 for the Navy sample.[1] At baseline, 2,724 married families—including a service-member, a spouse, and a child between the ages of 11 and 17 (if available)—completed interviews.[2] Follow-up assessments were conducted using a web-based survey every four months for three years (i.e., for a total of nine assessments).[3] Sampling weights were used to ensure that the sample of servicemembers at baseline was representative of married, deployable servicemembers across and within the Service branches and components that were actually deployed in the field during the first six months of 2012— an active period of follow-up for the study.

  • [1] The Navy baseline started one year later.
  • [2] If an eligible child was not available or if an eligible child was available but did not participate in the survey, then the servicemember and spouse were considered a household.
  • [3] If participants preferred phone-based surveys, that option was provided. Navy families were interviewed only seven times because this subsample of military families did not enter baseline data collection until one year after Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps families.
 
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