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Share everything

Staff and participants involved in a project should make sure they report even seemingly insignificant details, whether these are reports on problems noted or fresh ideas. If these are small, they could simply be logged and read through on a monthly basis. If they are larger, there may need to be a more formal process to deal with them. This is discussed further in Chapter 8. One staff member or participant may have an idea that could improve the project, or vague observations could, when combined, point to new avenues for exploration.

Spark with imagination, fuel with data

Evaluating an intervention should not be a one-off event but should happen periodically, either as fresh evaluations or as audits (discussed further in Chapter 9). The data from this will ensure that the project stays on target. However, evaluation is also an opportunity to test the feasibility of new ideas. Participants could be asked what they feel is lacking, or questions could be incorporated that explore new problems or challenges that the intervention could be adapted to encompass. Collection of data is a way of testing intuition.

Be a platform

Interventions should be broadcast to as many people as possible. Sharing ideas with external parties can in turn become a source of innovation through ensuing discussions and exchanges of new ideas. External parties may have suggestions for innovation.

Never fail to fail

Innovation brings with it the risk of potentially worsening a project. Of course, this should be planned for to ensure that it does not put patients at risk or have a negative consequence for those involved. However, with an attitude that mistakes will happen and appropriate safeguards in place, more innovative ideas may be incorporated even if it emerges that they do not improve the project in the way initially planned. It is only through testing that the successful ideas will also be found.

To find out more about Google’s eight pillars of information, visit the Think With Google website www.thinkwithgoogle.com.

 
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