Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Health arrow Arts in health : designing and researching interventions
Source

Outcome of the research study

Reporting results

If a research study has been well planned up front, with specific research questions and hypotheses, reporting the outcomes of the study should be relatively simple. In general, results are best mapped against the original questions. However, to support this, 5-point scales have been proposed below to assess

Table 10.15 The spectrum of options for health and wellbeing research outcomes

1

2

3

4

5

Depth/length

The study has not found significant changes or has found significant changes that do not support the hypotheses.

The study has found significant changes in a broad sense, but the specifics of these effects and length of the effect remain unknown.

The study has found significant changes in factors of health and wellbeing and there may be preliminary indications that these extend beyond the end of the sessions.

The study has found significant changes in multiple factors of health and wellbeing and data suggest that these changes will have an effect beyond the end of the study.

The study has found a comprehensive effect on health and wellbeing with lasting impact.

Breadth/reach

The study may or may not have found changes for the target participants, but either way has found no evidence of change for other people immediately involved, such as artists or healthcare professionals.

The study has found significant changes for target participants but no evidence of change in close family, carers, or staff who did not participate in the intervention.

The study has found significant changes for people immediately involved and those close to them but no evidence of change at an organizational or community level.

The study has found significant changes at organizational or community levels.

The study has found benefits extending to society more generally, reaching large numbers of people as a result of the project.

how well results have met the initial hypotheses and contextualize the strength of these findings (see Tables 10.15-10.18). For example, a small-scale study may have shown strong findings immediately after the intervention for participants involved in the project, but the 5-point scales help to show that these findings are still relatively limited if we do not know how long they lasted for, who else might have been affected, or whether there were any lasting financial benefits, etc. As always, the aim is not to judge studies for not being more ambitious or not asking more questions, but rather to appreciate their findings in proportion to what they have shown. While ‘significant’ is a term typically used to describe quantitative findings that are ‘statistically significant’ (meaning that

Table 10.16 The spectrum of options for social research outcomes

1

2

3

4

5

Depth/length

The study has not found significant changes or has found significant changes that do not support the hypotheses.

The study has found significant changes in social factors in a broad sense, but the specifics of these effects and length of the effect remain unknown.

The study has found significant changes in social factors and there may be preliminary indications that this may extend beyond the end of the sessions.

The study has found significant changes in multiple social factors and there are data suggesting that these changes will have an effect beyond the end of the study.

The study has found a comprehensive effect on social factors with lasting impact.

Breadth/reach

The study may or may not have found changes for the target participants, but either way has found no evidence of change for other people immediately involved, such as artists or social or healthcare professionals.

The study

has found

significant

changes

for target

participants,

those

immediately involved, but no evidence of change in close family, carers, or staff who did not participate in the intervention.

The study has found significant changes for people immediately involved and those close to them but no evidence of change at an organizational or community level.

The study has found significant changes at organizational or community levels.

The study has found benefits extending to society more generally, reaching large numbers of people as a result of the project.

the probability of the effect being found if in fact there is no effect is small), it is also used here in relation to meaningful qualitative findings.

 
Source
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Political science
Philosophy
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel