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Andras L. Pap is Research Chair and Head of Department for the Study of Constitutionalism and the Rule of Law at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Centre for Social Sciences Institute for Legal Studies, and a SASRO-Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow at the Institute of Sociology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. He is also Professor of Law at the Law Enforcement Faculty of the National University of Public Service and a Recurrent Visiting (Adjunct) Professor at the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. He has published 6 books, 6 textbooks and over 200 articles on constitutional law, human rights, minority rights and law enforcement issues.

 
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