Capabilities

The immigrants do not live, however, in a world of fantasy. They may believe ICTs have unique qualities and important functions, but they are very aware—many of them having acquired in their lifetime only very limited education—that one needs to acquire skills to utilize these devices.

“A,” who has never used a computer, sees utility in it only if you learn to use it. “The issue,” he says, “is not [getting] a computer. You need a course to learn how to use it. Not only Word, but that’s why you need a short quick course.” “R,” who is an autodidact, does not have a computer of his own; however he has “touched” a friend’s computer and says, “I think I want to buy, maybe. Because there are many things I cannot see, which I want to learn. I want to learn math and English.” “C” explains that

“the computer is very helpful, very helpful. How? it allows to learn many things,” but one cannot use it without the proper skills. He adds:

For example, if I approach someone who understands how to use a computer and ask: “How do you hear music? How do you see?” [He] can show me and also tell me how I can learn.. .it can help. Also I think you can hear things through it. It’s good.I did not study, but perhaps I can study with it, and find in it useful things. That’s what I think.

Having just joined the group recently, “W” refrains from communicating with his new friends over WhatsApp because he is uncomfortable writing in Hebrew. He understands that the basis for optimal utilization of ICTs is literacy, and he explains his perception of “trying” to overcome his inability to utilize the technology:

A computer, if you don’t use it, is worthless. You have to know how to use it in order to make it valuable for our lives. I think that if we will learn to use it, it can serve us as a group.A group is an important thing, because it can be a source for support, a place where someone who knows can help someone who doesn’t know.

 
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