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Notes

  • 1. Declarative knowledge and procedural knowledge also have neurophysiological correlates because they rely on various types of brain structures (see Aparicio & Rodrfguez-Moneo, 2015).
  • 2. It could be said that concepts are necessary but not sufficient, because thinking historically also requires procedural knowledge, knowing how to apply these concepts.
  • 3. Partonomic structures are especially useful for linking single concepts that have only one instance or element of said concept (e.g., ‘land’). These types of concepts occur frequently in history.
  • 4. Metaconceptual knowledge or metaknowledge refers to the knowledge about the nature of the content of a discipline (concepts, theories, goals, etc.), that is, epistemological knowledge. Metacognition is defined as the knowledge and control of one’s own cognitive processes. Although it is possible to establish differences, the boundaries between metaconceptual knowledge and metacognition are sometimes blurred.

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