Creating a Schedule

“Got it,” said Jonathan. “Did you get the draft schedule for the initiation and planning phases that I sent last week?” (The schedule is provided in Table 8-3.)

“Yes, I did,” said Samuel. “I think we’re in good shape. You included leadership policy and standard development in the Initiation and Setup phases and fully developed the plan in the Planning phase. Good. Also, make sure you include standard weekly meetings beginning in execution and running through closeout. You need to establish a consistent ‘battle rhythm’ for communications. Saul didn’t keep his meetings, and that cost him on his last project.”

Table 8-2 Google’s Characteristics of a Good Manager

#

Characteristic

Key Qualitative Question

1

Good coach

Does the project leader effectively coach his or her team members in a manner that improves performance?

2

Empowers team members

Does the project leader empower his or her team and avoid being a micromanager?

3

Expresses concern

Does the project leader express interest in and concern for team members’ success and personal well-being?

4

Gets results

Is the project leader productive and results oriented?

5

Good communicator

Is the project leader a good communicator who listens and shares information?

6

Develops team members

Does the project leader help team members with career development?

7

Establishes a clear vision

Does the project leader have a clear vision and strategy for the team?

8

Technically skilled

Does the project leader have key technical skills that help him or her advise the team?

Data derived from Garvin, D. (2013). How Google Sold Its Engineers on Management. Harvard Business Review (December).

“Got it,” said Jonathan.

Are You Practicing What You Preach?

“Now you need to practice what you’re preaching about leadership.” “Sir?” said Jonathan.

“Think about the experience you and Saul had with Joab last week,” Samuel continued, looking Jonathan in the eye.

“You heard about that, huh?” Jonathan said, leaning back and exhaling.

“Saul has never been concerned about Joab’s personal development,” Samuel said. “He never did anything but berate him in front of others. He blamed Joab for the issues that caused the last project to slip, and he never took any responsibility himself. Saul led the project; he had overall responsibility for the outcome, yet he blamed Joab and the customer. Saul could have taken proactive action to prevent the problem. He could have provided better project oversight, communications, and control. But instead, he threw Joab under the bus. Behavior like this builds resentment, and employees get their vengeance by leaving the company. And then you reinforced Saul’s poor leadership when you didn’t trust Joab’s advice about the IPM network module.”

Table 8-3 Initiation and Planning Schedule

10

Task Marne

Duration

Start

Finish

Predecessors

1

Kaplan Motors Dealership IP Surveillance—Initiation and Planning

39 days

2/1

3/24

2

Pre-Project Setup/lnitiating

14 days

2/1

2/1S

3

identify and validate project and organizational structure

1 day

2/1

2/1

4

Validate project business case

3 days

2/2

2/4

3

5

Review Statement of Work

2 days

2/2

2/3

6

Develop draft Statement of Success

1 day

2/4

2/4

5

7

Identify and analyze stakeholders

6 days

2/5

2/12

8

1 nitiai coordination with internal legal, contracting, accounting, and HR

3 days

2/5

2/9

6

9

Initial coordination with customers, vendors, suppliers

3 days

2/10

2/12

8

10

Define project charter components [deliverables, cost, approach, assumptions and constraints, risks, objectives)

3 days

2/15

2/17

7

11

Define project and product/service life cycle

1 day

2/15

2/15

12

Define leadership standards

2 days

2/16

2/17

13

Leadership Policy

1 day

2/16

2/16

11

14

Leadership Standard

1 day

2/17

2/17

13

75

Project Governance Review

7 day

2/1$

2/18

10

16

Project Charter Approval

0 days

2/18

2/18

15

Jonathan looked down at the floor, thinking more about the knot in his stomach than about how to respond.

“How do you feel?” asked Samuel.

“I feel horrible that I treated Joab the way I did,” Jonathan said. “I assumed, based on Saul’s attitude, that Joab was a loser. I didn’t even give him a chance. We’re obviously not

17

Develop Project Management Plan

25 days

2/19

3/24

18

Prepare scope document, Work Breakdown Structure, schedule, and resource requirements

3 days

2/19

2/23

16

19

Define change management process and plan

2 days

2/24

2/25

18

20

Develop communications plan

2 days

2/26

2/29

19

21

Develop risk management plan: (initial risk assessment, risk matrix, risk register, and stakeholder risk tolerance)

3 days

3/1

3/3

20

22

Develop quality, cost, procurement, staffing management, and transition plans

5 days

3/4

3/10

21

23

Complete Leadership Integration Plan

9 days

3/11

3/23

24

Team Charter

2 days

3/11

3/14

12,22

25

Leadership Training

3 days

3/15

3/17

24

26

Leadership Assessments

2 days

3/18

3/21

25

27

Leadership Lessons Learned Planning

1 day

3/22

3/22

26

28

Leadership Performance Improvement Planning

1 day

3/23

3/23

27

29

Project Governance Review

1 day

3/24

3/24

23

30

Project Plan Approval

0 days

3/24

3/24

29

following best practices for leadership. What if Joab leaves? How will that impact our business? I’ve never had to deal with these issues. The stakes are high for the business.”

“I share your concerns,” said Samuel. “We have to shift our focus. We have to be more collaborative and empowering. We have to take care of our people, both personally and professionally.”

“How do I approach this?” Jonathan asked. “All of this is new to me.”

“Everyone either has been through something, is going through something, or is about to go through something,” Samuel said. “You have to talk to your people, have a dialogue where you ask questions and listen to find out what that something is. Once you know their story, you can help them. This will help us develop a culture where we authentically treat our employees as well as we treat our customers.”

“I don’t feel comfortable talking to Joab about these issues,” Jonathan said. “I just want him to do the job. I’m not good at helping people with their issues.”

“But if you were able to help people, you could not only lead projects to successful outcomes, you could also inspire team members like Joab,” Samuel said. “You can give them encouragement that builds confidence, confidence that can help them be successful long after your project is over.”

Jonathan sat silently, looking down at the table.

“You see, your mind is like fertile soil that will grow whatever you plant,” Samuel continued. “The same soil that can grow delicious blueberries can also grow poisonous baneberries. You will reap the self-talk that you sow. You are responsible for planting positive thoughts in your own mind, thoughts that can result in positive outcomes. If you believe you’re not able to help people with their issues, you’re planting poisonous thoughts, and you’ll never help anyone. If you keep thinking like that, you won’t reach your leadership potential.”

“What should I do?” asked Jonathan. “What do you recommend?”

“Change your self-talk,” Samuel said. “Instead of saying ‘I don’t know how to help people with their issues,’ say ‘I care enough about my team members to listen to their feelings and to have a dialogue about their concerns.’ Say this to yourself in the morning and at night, every day; tweak your attitude so that you feel comfortable with this simple change in your point of view. If you believe you can make this change, you can make it. People in the company look up to you. I think it’s a small but worthy investment you can make in yourself.”

“OK,” Jonathan said. “I’m willing to try.”

“That’s the first step to becoming a leader instead of being just a manager,” Samuel said. “I want you to have a conversation with Joab. Find out what he’s going through right now. Figure out how to motivate him. Also, I’m going to send you material to read on Myers- Briggs Type Indicators, emotionally intelligent communications, personal credibility, selfleadership, and followership. You may not understand it all right away, but you need to start the journey.”

 
Source
< Prev   CONTENTS   Source   Next >