World Bank and Social Protection and Labor

The World Bank supports social protection and labor programs in developing countries as a central part of its mission to reduce poverty through sustainable and inclusive growth. The Bank has almost doubled its social protection and labor lending in the past few years to help countries respond to the food, fuel, and financial crises—from an

STAYING CONNECTED TO THE WORLD BANK GROUP

STAYING CONNECTED TO THE WORLD BANK GROUP

The Emergency Project to Assist Jordan Partially Mitigate Impact of Syrian Conflict provides supplies of vaccines and medicines for the growing population and ensures that Jordanians have affordable access to basic commodi¬ties such as bread and cooking gas. © World Bank / John Donelly (photographer). Permission required for reuse.

The Emergency Project to Assist Jordan Partially Mitigate Impact of Syrian Conflict provides supplies of vaccines and medicines for the growing population and ensures that Jordanians have affordable access to basic commodities such as bread and cooking gas. © World Bank / John Donelly (photographer). Permission required for reuse.

annual average of $1.6 billion in 1998-2008, to an annual average of $2.4 billion for 2012-13. Many social protection and labor programs are fragmented and lack harmonization, hampering their effectiveness.

The main objective of the World Bank's 10-year social protection and labor strategy is to help countries move from fragmented approaches to harmonized systems. It focuses on making these systems more inclusive of the vulnerable and more attuned to building people's capacities and improving the productivity of their work. The strategy lays out ways to deepen the Bank's involvement, capacity, knowledge, and impact in social protection and labor.

Rapid Social Response Program. The Rapid Social Response program provides catalytic resources in relatively small amounts to help low-income countries build social protection and labor systems, so that they are prepared for future crises.

Open Data for Social Protection and Labor. In 2012, the Bank launched the Atlas of Social Protection with Indicators on Resilience and Equity (ASPIRE) as the first global compilation of data from household surveys documenting social protection. It provides a worldwide snapshot of social protection coverage, targeting, and impact on well-being by identifying countries' social protection programs, grouping them into categories, harmonizing core indicators, and detailing people's well-being. ASPIRE is currently being expanded to include indicators on social protection and labor program design and performance based on administrative records on social insurance, social assistance, and labor market programs. The Bank also offers cross-country data for mandatory pension systems around the world.

Youth Employment Inventory. In collaboration with the German Agency for International Cooperation, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Youth Employment Network, and the International Labour Organization, the Bank has also developed a Youth Employment Inventory that provides comparative information on more than 500 youth employment programs in some 90 countries.

IFC, MIGA, and Social Protection and Labor

Projects undertaken by IFC and MIGA create jobs in the private sector; both institutions promote social protections and labor best practices in their client companies, as spelled out in their performance standards.

 
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