Table of Contents:

Note

1 Germany was the fourth largest donor in Pakistan in 2018 (Conrad 2018). Since the beginning of German-Pakistan development cooperation, Germany donated 3.5 billion euro to project work in Pakistan (see German Foreign Office 2019). Diplomatic relations between the two countries intensified since the launch of the Pak-Germany Strategic Dialogue in 2011. Other special institutional arrangements between the two countries have been made in specific sectors, such as trade and investment (Pakistan-German Business Forum), energy (Pakistan-German Renewable Energy Forum) or education (Germany-Pakistan Training Initiative).

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Annex 1. Anonymised list of interviews

Reference

Year

Interview

Type

Location

1

Military

Interview Participant #1, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Rawalpindi

2

Interview participant #6, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

3

Interview Participant #8, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Rawalpindi

4

Interview Participant #15, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

5

Interview Participant #19, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

6

Interview Participant #20, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

7

Interview Participant #21, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Lahore

8

Interview Participant #27, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

9

Interview Participant #28, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

10

Interview Participant #29, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

11

Interview Participant #33, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

12

Interview Participant #44, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Rawalpindi

13

Interview Participant #46, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

14

Interview Participant #48, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

15

Interview Participant #50, Senior Military Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

(Continued)

Reference

Year

Interview

Type

Location

16

Civil society actors (NGOs, think tanks, INGOs, other local organisations)

Interview Participant #2, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

17

Interview Participant #3, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

18

Interview Participant #4, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

19

Interview Participant #5, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

20

Interview Participant #9a, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

21

Interview Participant #9b, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

22

Interview Participant #10, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

23

Interview Participant #14, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Rawalpindi

24

Interview Participant #16, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

25

Interview Participant #17, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

26

Interview Participant #18, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

27

Interview Participant #22, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Lahore

28

Interview Participant #24, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Lahore

29

Interview Participant #25, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Lahore

30

Interview Participant #30, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

31

Interview Participant #31, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

32

Interview Participant #34, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

33

Interview Participant #35, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

34

Interview Participant #36, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

35

Interview Participant #37, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

36

Interview Participant #38, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

37

Interview Participant #39, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

38

Interview Participant #41, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

39

Interview Participant #49, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Peshawar

40

Interview Participant #51, Senior NGO Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

41

Focus group interview #52, Senior NGO Representatives

2017

Personal

Peshawar

{Continued)

Reference

Year

Interview

Type

Location

42

Academia

Interview Participant #7, Senior Academia Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

43

Interview Participant #13, Senior Academia Representative

2017

Personal

Rawalpindi

44

Interview Participant #23, Senior Academia Representative

2017

Personal

Lahore

45

Interview Participant #42, Senior Academia Representative

2017

Personal

Peshawar

46

Media

Interview Participant #11, Senior Media Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

47

Interview Participant #12, Senior Media Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

48

Interview Participant #32, Senior Media Representative

2017

Personal

Karachi

49

Interview Participant #40, Senior Media Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

50

Government/ political part}'

Interview Participant #45, Senior Government Representative

2017

Personal

Islamabad

51

Interview Participant #26, Senior Government Representative

2017

Personal

Lahore

52

Interview Participant #43, Senior Government Representative

2017

Personal

Peshawar

53

Interview Participant #47, Senior Government Representative

2017

Personal

Missing data

Annex 2. Inter-coder reliability test

 
Source
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