Protect Coastal Regions

This map displays the results for the Protect Coastal Regions value. The criteria informing this value identify pristine shoreline; near shore waters, coral reefs, and fisheries; protect estuaries and input of fresh water into the ocean; and protect natural waterways with sufficient flow into the ocean. The greatest weight was applied to protecting pristine shoreline and protecting nearshore waters, coral reefs, and fisheries.

Approximately 2,500 acres of land and 36,000 acres off-shore have been identified as high priority for conservation across the study area for this value. These high priority coastal areas make up approximately a quarter of the study area. In total, 23% of high priority land and off-shore acres in the study area have already been conserved. Nearly 1,900 acres have been identified as “pristine shoreline” (areas with less than 10% impervious cover) and over 80% of these acres have been preserved. Across the island, more than 40,000 off-shore acres and 6,000 land acres and have been identified as high priority for coastal protection.

Protect Natural Habitats

0‘ahu’s unique island ecosystems have created important places for more than 50 endangered and threatened native species to grow and thrive. Examples of endangered or threatened species include the ‘Ope‘ape‘a (Hawaiian hoary bat), llioholoikauaua (Hawaiian monk seal), and the Honu (Green sea turtle). One of the greatest threats to the continued viability of these species is habitat loss. Throughout the Greenprint process, residents and stakeholders expressed a strong desire to use land conservation to protect these native plants and animals.

The TPL map displays the results of the Protect Natural Habitats value. The criteria included protection of native forests, native and natural habitat, vegetation along streams, endangered and rare native species habitat, spawning habitat, native animal populations, ridges and mountaintops, unfragmented areas and protect intact ahupua‘a systems, protect and restore wetlands, provide wild and natural green areas, identify and protect endangered species areas for migration because of climate change, and protect karst systems. The greatest weight was applied to protecting native forests, native and natural habitat, and vegetation along streams.

More than 35,000 acres of land are identified as high priority for natural habitat protection within the study area. Nearly 18,000 acres of land have been identified as high priority for protecting unfragmented areas and intact ahupua'a systems and nearly 10,000 acres are high priority for protecting rare and endangered native species and habitats within the study area. Across the island, over 45,000 acres of land have been identified as high priority for natural habitats.4 The highest priority areas for the protection of natural habitats are along the Ko‘olau and Wai‘anae mountain ranges and their watersheds.

Increase Recreation and Public Access Opportunities

This map displays the results of the Increase Recreation and Public Access Opportunities value for the Olahu Greenprint. The criteria informing this value included protection of access to mountains and ocean; beach access; ocean fishing areas; improve, protect, and increase hiking trails and trail heads; and create more protected bicycle lanes.

More than 14,500 acres of land and nearly 1,000 off-shore acres have been identified high priority for increasing recreation and public access opportunities within the study area. More than 9,000 high priority land and off-shore acres have already been protected.

Across the island, over 18,000 acres of land have been identified as high priority for recreation and public access opportunities. Many of the highest priority areas for increasing recreation and public access opportunities are along the 0‘ahu coastline where there is no coastal access within V4 mile of the closest existing access point. The Mokapu peninsula and Pearl Harbor appear as high priority for increased access due to the fact that these military lands are currently off limits to the public. If all high priority bicycle trails/lanes were preserved within study area, 568 miles of new trails/ lanes would be created.

Preserve and Enhance View Planes

O'ahu’s scenic landscapes, providing unparalleled views of both pristine beaches and dramatic mountains, are an important part of Hawaii’s character and identity. The TPL map displays the results of the Preserve and Enhance View Planes value. The criteria informing this value included the protection of views of the shoreline/ocean and to preserve views of the undeveloped mountains and scenic views from roads.

Across the island, nearly 19,000 acres of land have been identified as high priority for the preservation and enhancement of view planes. Less than 5,000 acres of the high priority land acres for this value have been conserved across the island. The highest priority areas for preserving and enhancing view planes are on the North Shore, along watersheds on the Leeward coast, and along the ridgelines of the Windward coast. Areas described as particularly important for protection during public outreach included the views—both to and from—the Ka Iwi coast (from Hanauma Bay to Makapu'u), views of the dramatic peaks of the Ko‘olau range from the Pali and Kamehameha highways, and the views of Mt. Ka‘ala from the Leeward coast and North Shore.

Protect Water Quality and Quantity

Public water supplies in Olahu are provided entirely by groundwater while streams provide irrigation and vital aquatic habitat (Anthony, Hunt, Brasher, Miller, and Tomlinson, 2004,2). Municipal demands comprise more than 80% of total water use on the island and it is estimated that demand for municipal potable water will increase 33% between 2000 and 2030. Thus, the protection of water (both quantity and quality) is a pressing issue for the residents of 0‘ahu. This map displays the results of the Protect Water Quality and Quantity value for the Olahu Greenprint. The public outreach that developed included input from stakeholders at the first Island Leadership Team meeting. At that meeting, stakeholders expressed a desire to preserve whole watersheds, protect aquifer recharge, create connected greenways and protect vegetation along streams. Ultimately, the criteria informing this value included: protect natural waterways, near shore waters, and fisheries; protect and restore entire stream corridors, including vegetation; protect and restore wetlands; protect aquifer recharge; identify areas to recreate in watersheds; preserve whole watersheds; preserve natural springs. The criteria given the most weight were protect natural waterways, nearshore waters, and fisheries; protect and restore entire stream corridors, including vegetation, and protect and restore wetlands.

About 67,000 acres of land within the study area are identified as high priority for this value. Nearly 17,000 of these acres have already been conserved. Across the island, more than 100,000 acres of land (27% of O'ahu), have been identified as high priority for the protection of water quality and quantity. The highest priority areas for protecting water quality and quantity are watershed lands throughout Olahu. Throughout the Greenprint process, residents and stakeholders repeatedly stressed the importance of protecting water systems and land that can aide in creating continuity between mauka water sources, flowing streams, healthy estuaries, and the ocean.

 
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