Religious Education in Malawi and Ghana: Perspectives on Religious Misrepresentation and Misclusion


Organisation of the monographNotesReferencesI: Setting the contextReligion at school in Malawi and GhanaMethodological considerationsBråten’s model for comparative studies in religious educationResearch methodologyResearch methodsData collection toolsEthics: Confidentiality, coding, consent and accessApproaches to data analysisTransferability and dependabilityReferencesII: Framing the debateReligion as de/legitimised knowledgeDe/legitimisation of knowledge through ‘selective tradition’Religion and religious education as de/legitimised knowledgeScepticism as a problem for religious educationNotesReferencesConceptualising religious misrepresentationUnderstanding religious misrepresentationMisrepresentation of religion in religious education researchPower dynamics in religious representation: A postcolonial perspectiveConclusionNotesReferencesProblematising inclusive religious educationMethodological conceptions of pluralismUnearthing the vexed issue of cultural pluralism and inclusivityReligious diversity, epistemic relativity and religious educationNon-religious worldviews, inclusion and religious educationPedagogical approaches associated with inclusive religious educationPhenomenologicalCritical realistInterpretiveDialogicalOpenParticularistConclusionNotesReferencesIII: Empirical findingsMisrepresentation of Religion in Religious EducationDimensions of religious misrepresentation in religious education: A typologyFair representation of religionReligious misrepresentationReligious mis/representationHow misrepresentation of religion occurs in classroom discourseSchools representing themselves and othersStudents representing their religionsStudents representing other religionsTeachers representing themselves and othersConclusionNotesReferencesMisclusion of religion in religious education ‘texts’Why texts and misclusion? Some conceptual issuesReligious education texts: Policy, curriculum, syllabus and textbooksMisclusion of religion through factual inaccuraciesThe nature of religionChristianityIslamAfrican indigenous religions (AIR)Privileging ChristianityProselytisationConclusionReferencesMisclusion of religion in classroom discourseMisclusion of religion in classroom discourse: Some practical issuesInterreligious exclusionIntrareligious exclusionsResolving value conflictsTeacher agency, identity and religious educationDebates and controversy in religious education classrooms – an eyewitness accountTeachers’ misrepresentations as evidence of religious misclusionInsufficient teacher knowledge about religionsTeacher biasSecularising religious educationStudents’ misclusion of religions in religious educationBias-led religious misclusionLimited knowledge-related misclusionConclusionNoteReferencesFinal remarks
 
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