Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Health arrow Advance Care Planning

EDUCATION

In 2004, the Health Authority Executive Team approved and supported a team of health care professionals to attend education with Respecting Choices in Wisconsin. The foundational building of our program is owed in large part to this program and the founders of Respecting Choices for sharing wisdom, knowledge, challenges, and pragmatic suggestions.

Following the visit to Wisconsin, the FHA Executive Team and Advance Care Planning Steering Committee supported bringing Respecting Choices Faculty to the health authority to train both Facilitators and Instructors. As
a result, in 2005, 60 facilitators and 16 instructors completed the Respecting Choices course.

Education for health care professionals as well as the public has been an important aspect of our program. In 2006, we developed education specific and applicable to Fraser Health policies and procedures as well as provincial law. This included a 30-minute online learning module ( fraserhealth.ca/professionals/advance-care-planning/) with the following learning objectives:

■ Define ACP.

■ State and explain who can legally make an ACP.

■ State and explain three reasons why it is important to have an ACP.

■ State and explain who should be included in ACP discussions.

■ State and explain when health care providers, family, or friends would apply someone's ACP.

■ State and explain when it would be appropriate to begin having ACP discussions with people.

The module is complimented by 6 hours of classroom learning. Role playing is an integral part of learning. Although sessions are structured, scenarios and case studies are revised based on disciplines and programs in attendance. All health care professionals are supported and encouraged to attend this educational session. Sessions are interdisciplinary and include a multitude of programs such as renal, intensive care, medical/acute care, residential care, and community/clinic. This has proven to be successful as participants are able to learn from one another, begin to understand the complexity of all program areas, and see the need for effective communication between health care professionals. Sessions are limited to 21 participants and include the following objectives:

■ Describe the basic concepts of ACP.

■ Initiate an ACP conversation.

■ Describe the fundamental legal aspects of ACP.

■ Describe the challenges and opportunities involved with creating a personal ACP.

■ Discuss the importance of developing and maintaining organizational systems and practices for ACP.

These initial education sessions are open to all health care professionals. Unit clerks in hospital settings as well as office managers in home health programs are welcome to attend. Although they will not be engaging in ACP conversations with clients, it is imperative they are aware of ACP—what it is and why it is important, as well the system processes. These health care providers are an important part of our health care systems, are often the first
point of contact for patients and families, and can provide written materials as well as contact information. They often attend for personal reasons, and this supports, enhances, and facilitates sustainability in community. Organizations such as the Catholic Healthcare Association, Parkinson's Society, and Lymphoma and Leukemia Society have also attended and further enhance our philosophy that ACP is a shared responsibility. Health care professionals from other Canadian provinces have also attended the sessions and completed the online learning modules.

In 2008, a second online module and classroom session was developed in response to a growing need to further the learning of health care professionals. The online learning objectives include:

■ Define and explain the use of listening, questioning, exploring, and reflecting back while initiating and following up on ACP discussions.

■ Describe the importance of facilitating ACP conversations throughout the continuum of care and in what settings these conversations should take place.

■ Describe the elements of documenting ACPs and how to use the My Voice Workbook with clients.

■ Identify and effectively manage potential for conflict within ACP conversations.

■ Describe ACP policies and processes.

This module is also complimented by 6-hour classroom learning sessions. These classroom sessions are for clinicians who engage in ACP conversations routinely in their practice. Learning objectives include the following:

■ Describe the basic concepts of ACP, including who, why, and when individuals should have ACP conversations.

■ Define and explain the use of listening, questioning, exploring, and reflection while initiating and following up on ACP discussions.

■ Describe the importance of facilitating ACP conversations throughout the continuum of care and in what settings these conversations should take place.

■ Initiate an ACP conversation with a client and client's substitute decision maker.

■ Describe the elements of documenting ACP: how to use the My Voice Workbook with clients, and how to use the ACP Record.

■ Describe how to identify and manage potential for conflict within ACP conversations.

■ Describe ACP policies and processes.

In December 2008, a survey was completed by students who had attended the Level One 6-hour education session. Students stated that
following ACP education, they included individuals who they had not previously included in ACP conversations. In fact, there was an 11.2% increase in conversations with those with chronic illness and a 20.8% increase with healthy adults. Students noted that when clients and families engage in ACP, it helps with decisional conflict as well communication within the family and health care team. Most notably, when ACP took place, students stated client wishes were “always” honored.

Examples of specific program involvement include the Emergency Program where all directors, managers, and nurse supervisors complete the 30-minute online module. Following this, all nursing staff have been mandated to do the same. This will ensure that all Emergency Program staff have a common understanding of what ACP is and be better able and comfortable to support ACP with clients and families in this setting. As well, one of our surgical units supported all clinicians to attend the education. As a result, this unit distributes ACP materials to all adult patients when discharged and they organized a display of all ACP resources and materials.

Summary of Education

■ Be responsive to clinicians' educational needs.

■ Development and objectives of education must take into consideration the culture and history of your organization.

■ Review what ACP is throughout sessions.

■ Include legalities (state/provincial law) as well as organizational policies in sessions.

■ Welcome community organizations and members to attend sessions.

■ Sessions should be inclusive for all disciplines and all programs— community, hospital, and clinic settings.

 
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Political science
Philosophy
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel