Gather Information on the Process before Conducting the RIE

Where possible, the RIE Sponsor and team facilitator/mentor should help gather information on the targeted process before the RIE begins, before and after scoping, to use everyone’s time most effectively' during the RIE. This preliminary information will quickly familiarize the RIE team with the process and provide baseline data against which future improvements can be measured.58 Several Lean tools can guide the collection of additional information prior to the RIE. For example, Table 55 depicts a completed Measurable Benefits Data Plan, a useful data collection framework that prescribes some of the information that will be needed for the RIE project59 The data collection plan provides clear directions for gathering information, specifies ownership and accountability for ensuring its availability, surfaces problems with progress on data collection so that they can be addressed quickly, and focuses everyone’s attention on the RIE benefits that will be measured (i.e., if it isn’t measured, it can’t be improved).

GATHER INFORMATION ON THE PROCESS BEFORE CONDUCTING THE RIE: HELPFUL TOOLS

Data Collection Plan (Check Sheet/Manual Data Collection Templates)

Run Chart

Control Chart

Pareto Chart

Measles Chart

FMEA

Benchmarking

Measurable Benefits Data Plan

Five Whys

Simple Ethnography

Visit the Process in Action

RIE team members should visit the process, preferably as a group or in subgroups. This is particularly helpful for those processes that occur sporadically (e.g., freshman move-in, faculty sabbatical application). They should “walk” the process from beginning to end (some prefer from end to beginning), looking at the process both from the perspectives of the individuals

Table 5.5 Measurable Benefits Data Plan: Student Counseling Center Example

Benefit

Metrics for the RIE

Description of Measure

Data to be Collected

Timeline for Collection

Responsible Person and Progress (%)

Faster mental health services

How long students must wait before seeing a mental health counselor

Amount of time (days) between appointment request and scheduled Consultation and

Assessment

Interview

(C&AI)

appointment

Every third week of the fall and spring semesters

Associate

director

(50%)

Reduced number of student "no shows" for appointments

The number of students who fail to show for previously scheduled C&AI

appointment

Number of C&AI

appointments where students fail to show

Fall semesters (before RIE and after RIE)

Office

manager

(50%)

Reduced number of emergency service appointments

Students who falsely present as needing emergency services in order to receive faster mental health services

Decline (%) in number of emergency service requests from fall to fall

Fall semesters (before RIE and after RIE)

Office

manager

(using

Counseling

Center

database)

(50%)

Reduced waiting time

The time students spend in the waiting area for a

scheduled

C&AI

appointment

Time from scheduled appointment time to beginning of appointment

Fall semesters (before RIE and after RIE)

Counselors

(using

manual data

collection

template)

(30%)

(Continued)

Table 5.5 (Continued) Measurable Benefits Data Plan: Student Counseling Center Example

Benefit

Metrics for the RIE

Description of Measure

Data to be Collected

Timeline for Collection

Responsible Person and Progress (%)

Student

satisfaction

Student satisfaction with C&AI appointment process

Three-item

"Satisfaction

with

Counseling

Services"

survey

completed by C&AI student clients

Fall semester after RIE

Receptionist

(0%)

who provide the process and the beneficiaries of the process. For example, taking the role of a student ordering and picking up textbooks can provide some insights into interface issues, waiting in lines, etc. experienced by students and the challenges of distribution by employees sorting through packages of book orders. Direct observation of the process, with the opportunity to ask questions, provides a foundational understanding of the process during the RIE (e.g., creating a map of the current process).

Scour Archival Data and Reports

Information on the process may exist in archival data and university reports. For example, phone records can show the number and times of calls received by the financial aid office, providing information on peaks and valleys in call volume across the time of day or days of the week. (These data might prompt the RIE team to think about staff allocation or “work leveling” opportunities.) Similarly, quarterly or annual reports by the ITS area may provide the RIE team with information on service or repair requests received, average time to resolve the requests, and some sense of which problems are most frequent (e.g., hardware problems, software problems, forgotten passwords). Gathering these data can be challenging, because it is often difficult to locate the data and compile it in a useful fashion for the RIE team.60 The quality of information should be considered during compilation (e.g., was the internal report and its tables summarizing archival data presented in such a way to provide a more positive impression of student or parent satisfaction?).

GATHER INFORMATION ON THE PROCESS BEFORE THE RIE BEGINS: FRESHMAN MOVE-IN

Gathering information on the freshman move-in process was not possible, since the process occurred annually and the Freshman Move-In Task Force wanted the RIE to improve the process before the next move-in cycle. Therefore, with the help of the Office of LHE, the team facilitator and team leader gathered previous meeting minutes from freshman move-in debriefings, records of residence hall work orders submitted to university facilities and operations on the day of freshman move-in, and emails and notes in response to parent and student complaints about the freshman move-in process from the previous 3 years.

Collect Information on Metrics Selected to Document RIE Improvements

The RIE Sponsor or team facilitator/mentor can request that certain information be collected prior to beginning the RIE. This information, specific to the metrics selected to measure what beneficiaries value and expect from the process, will provide evidence-based insights into how the process is currently performing.61 For example, information on time spent uploading course materials, errors made in uploading course materials, and faculty satisfaction with the process of creating a course shell would be useful baseline information for an RIE team seeking to improve faculty experience with the university’s learning management system. Table 5-6 presents an example of a manual data collection template.62 The template, completed by employees in real time as they perform one of their key steps in the process, can provide the supporting data needed for the Measurable Benefits Data Plan (see Table 5.5). This information would then be compiled, analyzed, and summarized for the RIE team.

Additional data will likely be collected during the RIE (e.g., revisiting the workplace to observe one particular section of the process in more detail, running a small study on the amount of time saved if a form was reorganized). Overall, regardless of whether the method for gathering information on the process is developed locally by the RIE team or through a more elaborated system supported by the central LHE office, collecting it before the start of the RIE can save valuable time and offer early insights for the team.

Table 5.6 Manual Data Collection Template for Collecting Information on RIE Process: Student Counseling Center Example

Counselor Form for Tracking Waiting Time for Consultation and Assessment Appointments

Counselor Name: Nfcte Patrick Date: September ij-

Student (Last Four Digits of Student ID)

Scheduled Appointment Time

Time Start of Appointment

Notes

зу-og

>30

>42

JJ20

10:30

10:35

2*15

11:30

11:50

student arrived late for appoinJmgiU:

 
Source
< Prev   CONTENTS   Source   Next >