Influence of Individual Phylogenies

Tables 2 and 3 show the relative levels of evolutionary distinctiveness among sites when each of the 18 phylogenies is excluded from the analysis. It shows that some sites consistently have high levels of evolutionary distinctiveness, some have consistently lower levels, whereas some others show intermediate values and their ranking positions are more sensitive to the inclusion of any one phylogeny.

The sum of absolute difference in ranks when each of phylogeny was dropped synthetize this result (Figs. 6 and 7). It shows that several phylogenies contribute to site's ranking, refuting the hypothesis that site's ranking could be highly influenced by phylogenies with more species, or by a subset of phylogenies with more widespread species.

Fig. 2 Summed Ws values. The main figure shows the values standardized (= divided) by the number of phylogenies present at the site. The numbers on top of each bar give the number of species and phylogenies (in brackets and italics) at each site. The small figure at the bottom shows the non-standardized values

Fig. 3 Summed site scores for species on top and second ranks. The main figures shows the values standardized (= divided) by the number of phylogenies present at the site. The numbers on top of each bar give the number of scoring species and phylogenies (in brackets and italics) at each site. The small figure at the bottom shows the non-standardized values

Fig. 4 Over 80 % of the variation in the sites' Ws sums is explained by species richness (upper figure part). There is still a strong relationship between species richness and the WS sums when standardised by the number of phylogenies, suggesting that species rich sites also have more species with high WS values (lower figure part)

Fig. 5 A little over 50 % of the variation in the sites' top and second top scores is explained by species richness (upper figure part). There is also still a dependency between species richness and the site scores when these are standardised by the number of phylogenies, suggesting that species rich sites also have more species with high WS values (lower figure part)

Table 2 Site ranks (based Ws sum) if a given phylogeny is dropped

Values in red and bold are 'real' drops, i.e. the dropped phylogeny was indeed present at the site. A: ranks based on standardised values. B: ranks based on not standardised values. For a key to the phylogenies see Table 1

Table 3 Site ranks (based on Ws ranks) if a given phylogeny is dropped

Values in red and bold are 'real' drops, i.e. the dropped phylogeny was indeed present at the site. A: ranks based on standardised values. B: ranks based on not standardised values. For a key to the phylogenies see caption Table 1

Fig. 6 Sum over all sites of absolute differences in site ranks (based on Ws sum) if the phylogeny (x axis) is dropped. The main figures shows the values standardised (= divided) by the number of phylogenies present at the site when a phylogeny is dropped. The small figure at the bottom shows the nonstandardised values

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