Introduction

In a recent article [1] the association of age with lung function decline was summarized and showed a linear decline from maturity. If trajectories depicted in the paper are extrapolated (Fig. 6.1) , it becomes evident that the absolute extent of human life is limited, at least in part, by respiratory function to about 130 years but currently there are no confirmed cases available of people who lived to the absolute limit of pulmonary functional decline. A rare exception is Mrs Tuti Yusupova of Uzbekistan who died in 2014 apparently at the age of 134 [2]. Although caution is

K. Kvell • J.E. Pongracz (*)

Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, and Szentagothai Research Center, University of Pecs, 2 Rokus Str, Pecs 7624, Hungary e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017 87

V. Bueno et al. (eds.), The Ageing Immune System and Health,

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-43365-3_6

Correlation of lung capacity with age (dotted line shows predicted respiratory symptom threshold), using data from [1]

Fig. 6.1 Correlation of lung capacity with age (dotted line shows predicted respiratory symptom threshold), using data from [1]

required as her age has not been authenticated, she died as a very old person approaching the absolute limits of human life. The fully authenticated age to which any human has ever lived is 122 years and 164 days by Jeanne Louise Calment of France [3], who was born in 1875 and died in 1997. Ms Calment’s and Ms Yusupova’s very old age suggests that they suffered no detrimental co-morbidities and their genetic make-up regulating lung development, function and immune regulation was an enviably perfect combination. To understand more representative human ageing we have to use data from large population studies that have measured many aspects of human physiology, including lung function, over the lifespan.

 
Source
< Prev   CONTENTS   Source   Next >