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  • 1 Source of reference: http://news.carnoc.com/list/233/233244.html
  • 2 Source of reference: http://fmance.sina.com.cn/consume/puguangtai/20120905/14051 3053052.shtml
  • 3 Source of reference: http://cswb.changsha.cn/html/2012-09/05/content_8_1.htm
  • 4 Source of reference: http://cswb.changsha.cn/html/2012-09/05/content_8_1.htm
  • 5 Source of reference: http://phtv.ifeng.com/program/jmcwq/detail_2012_10/24/18527 080_0.shtml
  • 6 John Fiske calls this kind of rhetorical device as “metonymy.”
  • 7 Guo Zhanmin, “Improving the Qualities of the Employees and Enhancing Corporate Image,” in Production and Management, 2008, Issue 13, 34-35.
  • 8 John Fiske, Introduction to Communication Studies (2nd Edition), (London: Rout- ledge, 1990), 39.
  • 9 In my preceding discussions, I have already explained that the “system of signification” mentioned here can be more appropriately understood as “significant correlation.” For a more detailed explanation, please refer to Sui Yan, “The Conspiracy of Correspondence between Metalanguage and Metonymy,” in Journalism and Communication Review, 2010, Issue 1.
  • 10 Roland Barthes, Elements ofSemiology, trans. from the French by Annette Lavers and Colin Smith, (London: Jonathan Cape Ltd., 1967), 89.
  • 11 Reporter of The World of Public Relations, “The Age of Images and the Management of Images: An Interview of Prof. Ju Yi, Director of the Institute of the Modern City Image of Beijing,” in The World of Public Relations, 2002, Issue 1.
  • 12 Xu Chen, Corporate Identity, (Guangzhou: Zhongshan University Press, 1991), 11.
  • 13 Xuan Baojian, Media Image, (Beijing: Press of Communication University of China, 2009), 25.
  • 14 Luo Changhai, Principles of Corporate Identity, (Beijing: Tsinghua University Press,
  • 2003) , 2.
  • 15 The so-called “isology” pertains to two different layers. The first layer is that during the communication of a symbol, its denotative signification becomes no longer important and can even be overlooked. What really matters is the signified of the connota- tive signification. With no need to follow a complicated cognitive path, the public can automatically associate the signifier with the signified of the connotative signification. For example, when modern-day people see the rose, they would spontaneously think of love. The second layer is that the signifier of a symbol and the signified of the con- notative signification are defined by a single and indivisible relationship. For instance, for Channel No.5, its connotative signified is exclusively “nobility and sexiness.”
  • 16 Source of reference: http://finance.ifeng.com/roll/20110819/4417539.shtml
  • 17 Li Sen, Planning Corporate Image, (Beijing: Tsinghua University Press, 2009), 4.
  • 18 Ferdinand De Saussure et al., Course in General Linguistics, trans. from the French by Wade Baskin, (New York: Philosophical Library Inc. 1959), 71.
  • 19 Kent Wertime, Image Economy, trans. Liu Shunyao, (Beijing: China Textile Press,
  • 2004) , 28.
  • 20 Sui Yan, “The Mechanisms Whereby Symbols Communicate Meaning: An In-Depth Analysis of Naturalization and Generalization Mechanisms,” in Studies in Journalism and Communication, 2008, Issue 3.
  • 21 Roland Barthes, Mythologies, trans. Xu Qiangqiang and Xu Qiling, (Shanghai: Shanghai People’s Press, 1999), 167.
  • 22 Wang Shijin, “A Study of the Part and the Whole from the Perspective of Fractal Theory,” in Journal of Systems Science, 2006, Issue 1.
  • 23 Chen Xianda and Yang Geng, Principles of Marxist Philosophy, (Beijing: Press of Renmin University of China, 2010), 88.
  • 24 ChenXianda and Yang Geng, Principles of Marxist Philosophy, (Beijing: Press of Renmin University of China, 2010), 90.
  • 25 John Fiske, An Introduction to Communication Studies (2nd Edition), (London: Rout- ledge, 1990), 95.
  • 26 Roland Barthes, Elements ofSemiology, trans. Li Youzheng, (Beijing: Press ofRen- min University of China, 2008), 69.
  • 27 Jean Baudrillard, The ConsumerSociety, trans. Liu Chengfu and Qian Zhigang, (Nanjing: Nanjing University Press, 2000), 3.
  • 28 Jean Baudrillard, The ConsumerSociety, trans. Liu Chengfu and Qian Zhigang, (Nanjing: Nanjing University Press, 2000), 3.
  • 29 Yu Duoxing, “An Analysis of Xun Zi’s Theory of the Conventional Nature of the Naming Process and Its Convergence with the Theory of Causal and Historical Paradigms of Naming,” in Theoretical Community, 2011, Issue 7.
  • 30 Yu Duoxing, “An Analysis of Xun Zi’s Theory of the Conventional Nature of the Naming Process and Its Convergence with the Theory of Causal and Historical Paradigms of Naming,” in Theoretical Community, 2011, Issue 7.
  • 31 Zhong Jing, A New Selection of Classic Cases of Advertising, (Beijing: Economic Management Press, 2007), 79.
  • 32 Source of reference: www.haagendazs.com.cn/
  • 33 Zhang Yibing, “Consumer Ideology: The Death of Truth by the Manipulation of Signs-Understanding Jean Baudrillard’s The Consumer Society,” in The Consumer Society, Jean Baudrillard, trans. Liu Chengfu and Quan Zhigang, ed. Zhang Yibing, (Nanjing: Nanjing University Press, 2000), 7.
  • 34 Sui Yan, “The Tricks of Symbolic Communication/’ in Television Studies, ed. Liu Hong, (Beijing: Press of Communication University of China, 2008), Issue 2, 23.
  • 35 Li Siqu, “The Symbols of Advertising and the Binary Structure of Consumption,” in Journal of Southwest University for Nationalities (Philosophy and Social Science Edition), 2000, Issue 5.
  • 36 Lin Shengliang, Communication Studies in Cross-Cultural Advertising, (Fujian: Xiamen University Press, 2011), 48.
  • 37 Lin Shengliang, Communication Studies in Cross-Cultural Advertising, (Fujian: Xiamen University Press, 2011), 48.
  • 38 Source of reference: http://news.163.com/special/j/jiaofeng040923.html
  • 39 Stuart Hall, Encoding and Decoding, trans. Wang Guangzhou, Luo Gang and Liu Xiangyu, in Readers in Cultural Studies, ed. Luo Gang and Liu Xiangyu, (Beijing: Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Press, 2000), 355.
  • 40 Stuart Hall, Encoding and Decoding, trans. Wang Guangzhou, Luo Gang and Liu Xiangyu, in Readers in Cultural Studies, ed. Luo Gang and Liu Xiangyu, (Beijing: Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Press, 2000), 355.
  • 41 Zheng Wendong, “Semiosphere: The Vehicle of a National Culture,” Russian Education in China, 2005, Issue 4.
  • 42 Sut Jhally, The Codes of Advertising, trans. Ma Shanshan, (Beijing: Press ofRenmin University of China, 2004), 155.
  • 43 Lin Shengliang, Communication Studies in Cross-Cultural Advertising, (Fujian: Xiamen University Press, 2011), 167.
  • 44 Stuart Hall et al., Culture, Media and Language, (London: Routledge, 1980), 119.
  • 45 Sut Jhally, The Codes of Advertising, Fetishism and the Political Economy ofMeaning in the Consumer Society, (London: Routledge, 1990), 129.
  • 46 Sut Jhally, The Codes of Advertising, Fetishism and the Political Economy ofMeaning in the Consumer Society, (London: Routledge, 1990), 129.
  • 47 In aesthetics, the Reception Theory maintains that a work of art created by the author is only half-done, with too many uncertainties and gaps to be filled in by the audience who interprets the work from different perspectives. Such a work is complete only when all those gaps are filled in.
 
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