Limitations

It was not possible to include all stakeholders in consultation workshops or visit outer islands. However, University of the South Pacific Global Climate Change Alliance project In-Country Coordinators, who work directly with at least 3 vulnerable communities in each country, were instrumental in the consultations.

Literacy and education levels amongst the stakeholders were high, but some language barriers were apparent. Group consultations can be dominated by a few confident people. Additionally, although a “standard” consultation-workshop format was devised, the consultations took on a national flavour with some areas receiving more attention than others—depending on the focus of the stakeholders or the national priorities.

The Pacific Policy Context—CCA and DRM/DRR Linkages

The significance of capacity building on climate change adaptation to the sustainable development of the P-ACP countries can be seen by the endorsement by the Forum Leaders of the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change (PIFACC). This framework has themes on Capacity Building, Education, Training and Awareness with outcomes of:

  • • Increased awareness and understanding of sustainable energy and climate change issues among communities and other stakeholders
  • • Strengthened capacity to monitor and assess impacts of sustainable energy and climate change interventions
  • • Strengthened capacity to identify, design and implement effective sustainable energy and climate change measures

In recognition of the fact that climate change is a slow-acting disaster for the region amongst other factors, during the lifetimes of the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change 2006-2015 and the Pacific Disaster Risk Reduction and Disaster Management Framework for Action 2005-2015, efforts were made across the region to integrate climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction policy. These efforts are still ongoing. The linkages between CCA, DRM & DRR are outlined in Fig. 19.1.

To a large extent, the process by which integration of CCA and DRR/DRM has occurred regionally is via “mainstreaming” climate change into regional and national policy development and via the development and support of the regional Strategy for Climate and Disaster Resilient Development in the Pacific (SRDP). However, the SRDP has yet to be adopted regionally to replace the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change 2006-2015 and the Pacific Disaster Risk Reduction and Disaster Management Framework for Action 2005-2015.

The overall aim of integrating CCA and DRM/DRR is to support the resilience of communities across the region to climate change and disaster impacts. This can

Linkages between disaster risk management and climate change adaptation Source Adapted from Pacific Disaster

Fig. 19.1 Linkages between disaster risk management and climate change adaptation Source Adapted from Pacific Disaster (2015) be achieved by developing effective, appropriate and integrated methods of risk and vulnerability assessment, planning, adaptation activities and monitoring. To be a successful integrated strategy it will need to provide input into human capacity building via training for key stakeholder groups that have a crucial role in addressing the impacts of climate change and disasters in the Pacific region. Key stakeholders have been identified as Governments (national and local), the private sector, civil society organisations, rural communities, regional organisations and development partners. The SRDP also states that “Such needs-based capacity building can provide a significant return on the investment.” It has also been recognized that regional resilience starts at local level with awareness (on climate change, disaster risk and emissions reduction), training, education and action. Training and capacity development has also been highlighted as a requirement for NGOs, for national disaster agencies and other key stakeholders (such as lands, meteorological and hydrological services, health, education, tourism, planning, etc.). The SRDP process had also identified that “The education sector, in particular, has a key role to play in conducting education, training and awareness-raising in relation to climate and disaster resilience. Opportunities for their active involvement need to be identified.”

 
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