Public Research Organisations

Most public research is conducted by the 14 research-intensive universities which cooperate in the VSNU. The universities include three universities of technology, one agricultural university and the Open University. The Netherlands maintain a binary system with nearly 40 more vocational HEIs called Hogescholen (in English usually referred to as universities of applied sciences) next to the universities. Finally, there are other, more specific (e.g. belief focussed) public and private HEIs.[1]

In addition to their other tasks, the NWO and KNAW also maintain institutes in which research is being conducted and there are a (decreasing) number of research institutes affiliated with ministries.[2] Furthermore, there are also research organisations which receive public funding and focus on more applied research such as the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (Nederlandse Organisatie voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek), agricultural research institutes and large technology institutes.[3] In addition to these physical institutions, the Dutch government has, since the 1990s, begun initiatives for collaborative research organisations. These include the ‘Top Technological Institutes’ focusing on industrially relevant research[4] [5] and the Top Consortia for Knowledge and Innovation (Topconsortia voor Kennis en Innovatie, TKI) focussing on research in nine sectors (horticulture and propagating stock, agriculture and food, water, life sciences and health, chemistry, high tech, energy, logistics and creative industries) which have been identified as the particular strengths of the Netherlands (topsectoren).120 Research organisations are regularly evaluated on the basis of the Standard Evaluation Protocol[6] which has been established by VSNU, NWO and KNAW.[7]

  • [1] See on HEI research Arnold et al. 2006, p. 30; Braun 2006, p. 3; De Weert and Boezerooy2007, p. 37; Jongbloed 2010, pp. 287, 290, 293; van der Meulen 2010, p. 515 seq; Leisyte 2011,p. 440; Chiong Meza 2012, p. 2 seq; Mostert 2012, pp. 7, 15, Euraxess (2016) Where does Dutchresearch take place? http://www.euraxess.nl/incoming-researchers/research-landscape/where-does-dutch-research-take-place. Accessed 10 August 2016, Matthijs et al. 2016, p. 18.
  • [2] Arnold et al. 2006, pp. 30, 42; Braun 2006, p. 3; Jongbloed 2010, p. 282 seq, 288, 290; vander Meulen 2010, p. 516; Mostert 2012, p. 16 seq, Euraxess (n 116), Matthijs et al. 2016, p. 18.
  • [3] Jongbloed 2010, p. 290; Mostert 2012, pp. 12, 16, Euraxess (n 116).
  • [4] Arnold et al. 2006, p. 30; Braun 2006, pp. 4, 8; Jongbloed 2010, p. 292 seq, 307 seq; van derMeulen 2010, p. 520 seq; Mostert 2012, p. 16, Euraxess (n 116), Matthijs et al. 2016, p. 50.
  • [5] Mostert 2012, p. 5 seq, 20, Euraxess (n 101), Rathenau Instituut (n 108) section ‘Policyand structure—Governance of Science’, Topsectoren (2016) Innovatie (English translation:Innovation). https://www.topsectoren.nl/innovatie. Accessed 11 August 2016.
  • [6] KNAW et al. (2014 (up-dated 2015)).
  • [7] Becker 2009, p. 162; Jongbloed 2010, p. 301 seq; van der Meulen 2010, p. 518; ChiongMeza 2012, p. 21 seq; Mostert 2012, pp. 7, 9, 19; European Commission 2015, p. 468; Matthijset al. 2016, pp. 17, 29, 90.
 
Source
< Prev   CONTENTS   Source   Next >