University setting

Transliteracy in university contexts was seen through a lens of research in literary and historical studies. While all participants discussed their research projects, they also referred to their experiences with students related to the use of electronic resources and, in some cases, particular project outcomes related to teaching and education. A summary of data-gathering in the university setting is provided in Table 2.2 and a summary of participants’ profiles in Table 2.3.

Roles of electronic texts in research projects in the humanities

As mentioned at the beginning of this chapter, the study under this title (above) was conducted for my doctoral thesis. The study explored interactions with e-texts and their role in research by looking into the development of participants’ research projects. Sixteen historians and literary scholars from two major Australian cities and one participant from the United States discussed thirty research projects in interviews and provided data about their projects in other forms. Participants represented a variety of fields and disciplinary orientations and discussed projects on wide-ranging topics and time periods. Some of them conducted what is normally considered traditional humanities research, while others were deeply involved with the digital world. A study requirement, however, was to focus on research projects

Table 2.4 Data-gathering summary by sector

High school

University

Total

Participants Teachers, Library staff

83 students

19

102

Interviews

10

23

33

Focus groups

4 (37 participants)

-

4

Survey responses

84

-

94

Audio tapes

-

2

2

Other forms of data-gathering

Yes

Yes

aiming to produce traditional academic outputs. Details about sources of data for the study of transliteracy are presented in Table 2.2.

 
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