What are the employee's responsibilities in the performance assessment phase?

Both the manager and the individual have responsibilities in the performance assessment phase of the process, just as they do in each of the other phases. The individual has six key responsibilities:

1. Review your personal performance over the year.

2. Assess your performance and accomplishments against the development plan.

3. Prepare a list of your accomplishments and achievements and send it to your appraiser.

4. Write a self-appraisal using the appraisal form.

5. Consider any revisions needed to your key position responsibilities, goals, objectives, competencies, and development plans for the next performance review cycle.

6. Prepare for the performance review meeting.

Tell Me More

Review your personal performance over the year. Performance appraisal is not exclusively the responsibility of the manager. Each person regularly needs to ask himself the question, "How am I doing?" The advantage of a formal performance appraisal system is that it forces this beneficial review on at least an annual basis.

Assess your performance and accomplishments against the development plan. The manager's assessment concentrates on how well the individual did in meeting job responsibilitiesgoals, objectives, competencies. The individual needs to do the same. Another area for the individual to closely focus on is how well she did in carrying out the development plans that were made at the start of the year.

Prepare a list of your accomplishments and achievements and send it to your appraiser. Whether or not the manager requests the individual to write an accomplishments list, the wise individual in every organization always keeps track of her major successes and achievements (and makes sure that the manager is aware of them).

Write a self-appraisal using the appraisal form. Again, whether or not the organization requires self-appraisal as part of the performance evaluation process, it's a good idea for the individual to draft a self-appraisal before sitting down for the formal performance review.

Consider any revisions needed to your key position, responsibilities, goals, objectives, competencies, and development plans for the next performance-review cycle. Creating an accomplishments list and writing a self-appraisal uncovers areas of the job that have changed since the original performance-planning meeting was held. Some projects have been finished; some goals have been achieved or abandoned. Some key job responsibilities have shifted in importance. The annual performance appraisal review is the ideal time to recognize job changes and discuss how the job will be different in the upcoming year.

Prepare for the performance review meeting. Each individual should ask herself: What do I want to get out of this performance review? What are the questions that I want to get the answers to? What are the accomplishments over the year that I want to make sure my boss recognizes? What do I need to do to be a prime candidate the next time a promotional opportunity comes around?

What are my boss's responsibilities in the performance assessment phase? Does she have to review and approve my appraisals before I deliver them to my staff?

In the performance assessment phase, the reviewerthe supervisor's supervisorhas a specific set of responsibilities. The primary ones are to:

- Ensure timely completion of performance reviews.

- Ensure fair, thorough, and complete reviews.

- Ensure inter-rater reliability.

- Ensure tough-minded, demanding performance standards are set.

- Coach appraisers for success.

Tell Me More

The reviewer is the individual who is responsible for reviewing performance appraisals written by his or her subordinate managers before they go over those appraisals with their employees. If you are a manager who not only has to write appraisals but also has to review those written by managers who report to you, here are the key responsibilities that you need to meet in your reviewer role:

Ensure timely completion of performance reviews. Your first responsibility is to make sure that all managers in your work unit complete their performance appraisals on time. Enough said.

Ensure fair, thorough, and complete reviews. While the people whose performance reviews you'll be reviewing don't work directly for you, you probably know all of them reasonably well. Do the appraisals that their managers have written conform with your feelings about how well they have done? Are all aspects of their performance covered? Does it appear that any personal biasespositive or negativeare creeping in? If so, discuss these with the appraisal writer.

Ensure inter-rater reliability. Are all of your managers applying the same standards to their people? Does one manager put more emphasis on competencies than another? Your job here is to make sure that an individual who performed at a certain level will get the same performance appraisal rating, whether the appraisal is written by manager A, manager B, or manager C.

Ensure tough-minded, demanding performance standards are set. Now your job gets harder. Are some of your managers more lenient or tougher than others? Unless there are compelling reasons to the contrary, the standards of the toughest appraiser in your work group should set the tone for all managers charged with doing performance appraisals.

Red Flag

It's very likely that different managers have different performance expectations and standards. Some are likely to be tough and demanding while others are pushover pussycats. It's an easy temptation for the reviewer to coax the more demanding managers to soften their standards ("Gee, Jim, you seem to be pretty hard on Harry"). It is more difficult to force reluctant raters into holding people's feet to the high-performance fire ("Diane, your people are putting forth any level of effort that they feel like and you're not holding them accountable"). It's more difficult to raise performance standards than it is to lower them, buthey, palthat's why you're the boss!

Coach appraisers for success. Once you have reviewed and approved the written performance appraisals your managers have written, be sure to review their plans for conducting the appraisal discussion. It's likely that some of your managers may never have delivered a performance appraisal before. Help them succeed by coaching them on your experience or engaging in a practice session.

 
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