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Notes

1. Sections of this chapter are directly adapted from the following: Takeuchi, L., & Levine, M. H. (in press). Learning in a digital age: Towards a new ecology of human development. In A. Jordan & D. Romer (Eds.), Media and the well-being of children and adolescents. New York: Oxford University Press.

Levine, M. H., & Vaala, S. E. (2013). Games for learning: Vast wasteland or a digital promise? In F. C. Blumberg & S. M. Fisch (Eds.), Digital Games: A Context for Cognitive Development and Learning. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 139, 71-82.

  • 2. The authors greatly appreciate the editorial advice and review of relevant literature conducted by Christina Hinton and Anna Ly in preparing this chapter.
  • 3. According to Moore’s Law, which is the observation that over the history of computing hardware, the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles about every two years (Moore, 1965).

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