Introduction

Evolution of Intervention Practice. Last Experiences of Urban Regeneration in Spain

During the years of economic prosperity, the public administration promoted a wide range of experiences of urban regeneration. If we had to do a quick typing, we could point out some cases and kinds of intervention as an example exposure.

A. Bosqued (H)

Department of Architecture, Universidad Nebrija, Madrid, Spain e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it

F.J. Gonzalez • S. Moreno

School of Architecture, Engineering & Design,

Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid, Spain e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it

S. Moreno

e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it © Springer International Publishing AG 2017

R. Alvarez Fernandez et al. (eds.), Carbon Footprint and the Industrial Life Cycle, Green Energy and Technology, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-54984-2_2

The Last Generation of Interventions in Historic Centers

Following the conservationist success of the plans for the protection of historic centers during the 1980s and 1990s, the proposals have pointed in recent years to combine the tourist and commercial capacity of their heritage by restoring these urban spaces, which lost vitality, both functional and demographic.

In Santiago de Compostela case of study (MAP 1) there are programs to link public housing to public rent with the refurbishment of buildings or the implementation of “green strategies” to improve urban metabolism of these tissues, with new points of view on the use of water, naturalized spaces and energy.

In Lavapies, Madrid (MAP 2), public investment has focused on the re-qualification of public spaces and facilities as strategy for integrating the cultural diversity of a neighborhood that has 42% of foreign immigrant population belonging to 113 different places of Origin. Without abandoning the rehabilitation of housing, the investment in equipment of metropolitan rank has not meant the deployment of a mass gentrification process and nevertheless has allowed to developing a way of coexistence.

Similar experiences, adjusted to the local peculiarities, have been developed in many Spanish cities, among which we could highlight the rehabilitation of the Casc Antic and the discussed renovation operations in the Raval of Barcelona (MAP 3), the performances in the squares of the Historic center of Seville (MAP 4) and the recovery of plots as squares, in a remarkable performance for the recovery of the center of Zaragoza (MAP 5), to highlight some examples (Fig. 1).

 
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