Residential Development Trends

A key indicator of residential development trends is building approval and completions data. This information is usually sourced from permits issued by local government authorities or other authorities responsible for authorising development and construction work. It is important to distinguish between the number of dwellings in each approval and approval numbers themselves.

Overall, the process for analysing new housing supply involves examining change in the overall housing stock (including the type and size of dwellings) over reporting periods, and comparing this change to other locations. Changes in housing tenure should also be examined between reporting periods.

The other important indicator relates to the availability of housing land. Depending on the planning jurisdiction this might mean the proportion of land that is zoned to permit housing development, the amount of sites with planning permission for housing or the amount of approved residential subdivisions.

Since the private sector development and house building industry will play a major role in delivering the housing, it is important to understand their motivations and factors which might stimulate or inhibit their activity. It may be particularly important to consult with developers who concentrate on the affordable end of the market. Similarly, private landlords have a crucial impact on rental housing supply. Although it can be difficult to consult with large numbers of small individual, unorganised landlords, surveys or monitoring of low-cost providers can provide helpful information about the sector.

Potential opportunities to generate new housing development are a major component of the strategy. In addition to identifying appropriate locations for new or increased housing development, the strategy might also identify vacant sites in public ownership, or locations in need of renewal. These opportunities can be further developed through the strategy in response to the housing needs assessment.

 
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