INSTALLATION OF THE FOOD PROCESSING EQUIPMENT IN THE FOOD FACTORY

Clearance With Respect to the Floor, Walls, and Adjacent Equipment

There should be enough clearance under the machine to allow for adequate cleaning and inspection to be carried out effectively. With that purpose, the process equipment should be installed as high off the ground as possible (Fig. 6.79). The minimum height should be a function of the depth of the bottom surface above the floor (indicative: 150—300 mm). For largesized equipment, greater distances apply (at least 0.5 m from walls), as it is necessary to be able to walk around such equipment and have at least enough room to facilitate cleaning. If the equipment is sealed against the mounting surface, care must be taken to avoid gaps, cracks or crevices where insects or microorganisms can remain/survive after cleaning.

Installation of large equipment (e.g., freezing equipment, meat curing chambers) on feet is technically not always possible. An alternative is sealing the equipment onto the factory floor. Proper sealing of the perimeter between the equipment and the subfloor must prevent water from accidentally getting

Process equipment should be installed as high off the ground as possible to facilitate cleaning and reduce the risk of cross-contamination during cleaning operations

FIGURE 6.79 Process equipment should be installed as high off the ground as possible to facilitate cleaning and reduce the risk of cross-contamination during cleaning operations. In this case, dirt released from the floor during high-pressure cleaning may splash on the process equipment. Courtesy of Joe Stout, Commercial Food Sanitation LLC - Intralox, © 2016.

into this space. But sealing, especially with silicone, has not always proven to be successful in excluding wet and unhygienic conditions.

Equipment must not be mounted beneath tanks or vessels so that maintenance and cleaning are impeded but must be easily accessible. Increased elevation of tanks and vessels facilitates cleaning and maintenance operations beneath them but water and condensation running down their sides may allow microbial growth and certainly must not fall onto exposed product.

 
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