Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Travel arrow Linking urban and rural tourism : strategies in sustainability
Source

Power as a construct

Simply, power can be conceptualized as ‘a basic constituent of human existence that works to shape the oppressive and productive nature of the human tradition’ (Kincheloe and McLaren, 2008, p. 411). Only a handful of researchers have begun to pull from core social theory to examine power within tourism. Church and Coles (2007) argue this same issue and note that the few who have engaged with power theory were not drawn into a heavy analysis of it within the context of tourism, and further, routinely use a ‘single “brand” of power theory’ (p. xi). Table 3.1 provides a brief overview of the work of four well-known social theorists - Marx, Gramsci, Althussuer and Foucault - which highlights important differences in how they conceptualize power. For example, Althusser approaches power as a structuralist, while Foucault takes a post-modern approach. Likewise, related concepts such as hegemony and ideology are defined as they are directly related to various conceptualizations of power.

Tourism researchers in the fields of geography, anthropology and other social sciences have a long tradition of asking critical questions related to power, yet these critical perspectives within tourism planning, particularly integrated tourism planning, are relatively new. In the context of tourism planning, power is about control and is employed by dominant social groups to achieve their best interest.

 
Source
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Political science
Philosophy
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel