Notes

  • 1. Jostein Gaarder, Sophie’s World: A Novel About the History of Philosophy, trans. Paulette Muller (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1994), 42.
  • 2. Ibid., 42.
  • 3. Norman Brosterman, “Potential Architecture: An Infinity of Buildings,” in Potential Architecture: Construction Toys from the CCA Collection (Montreal, Canada: Centre Canadien d’Architecture, 1991), 7-14.
  • 4. Mark J.P. Wolf, “Prolegomena,” in Mark J.P. Wolf, ed., LEGO Studies: Examining The Building Blocks of a Transmedial Phenomenon (New York: Routledge, 2014), xxii.
  • 5. Arie Kruglanski, Lay Epistemics and Human Knowledge: Cognitive and Motivational Bases (New York: Springer Science and Business Media, 1989), 11.
  • 6. Sherry Turkle, Evocative Objects: Things We Think With (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2007).
  • 7. David Gauntlett, “The LEGO System as a Tool for Thinking, Creativity, and Changing the World,” in Mark J.P. Wolf, ed., LEGO Studies, 189205.
  • 8. Plato, Plato: Complete Works, ed. John M. Cooper (Indianapolis: Hackett, 1997), 554.
  • 9. Plato, The Laws of Plato, trans. Thomas Prangle (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980), 207.
  • 10. Kathryn Morgan, Myth and Philosophy from the Presocratics to Plato (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), 168.
  • 11. Daniel S. Werner, Myth and Philosophy in Plato’s Phaedrus (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 224.
  • 12. Armand D’Angour, “Plato and Play: Taking Education Seriously in Ancient Greece.” American Journal of Play 5/3 (2013): 293-307.
  • 13. Johan Huizinga, Homo Ludens (London: Routledge, 1980).
  • 14. John Wall, “All the World’s a Stage: Childhood and the Play of Being,” in Emily Ryall, Wendy Russell, and Malcolm MacLean, eds., The Philosophy of Play (New York: Routledge, 2013), 40.
  • 15. Brian Sutton-Smith, The Ambiguity of Play (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009), 219.
  • 16. John Locke and James Axtell, The Educational Writings of John Locke: A Critical Edition with Introduction and Notes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1968).
  • 17. Barry Dixon, “Gadamer and the Game of Dialectic in Plato’s Gorgias,” in Emily Ryall, Wendy Russell, and Malcolm MacLean, eds., The Philosophy of Play (New York: Routledge, 2013), 64.
  • 18. Heidi Moore, “Why Play is the Work of Childhood.” Fred Rogers Center, September 23, 2014. Available at http://www.fredrogerscenter.org/ 2014/09/23/why-play-is-the-work-of-childhood/ (accessed February 23,2017).
  • 19. Scott Brave, “LEGO Planning,” in Sherry Turkle, ed., Falling for Science: Objects in Mind (Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 2008), 159.
  • 20. Garth Sundem, “Building With LEGO Kit Instructions Makes Kids Less Creative.” Psychology Today, June 16, 2015. Available at https://www .psychologytoday.com/blog/brain-candy/201506/building-lego-kit- instructions-makes-kids-less-creative (accessed December 7, 2015).
  • 21. The center of the internet universe as we know it now began as ten 4GB hard drives, held together by LEGO bricks. See http:// news.stanford.edu/news/2011/april/google-stanford-ties-042811.html (accessed August 18, 2016)
  • 22. Sigmund Freud, “Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming,” in Peter Gay, ed., The Freud Reader (New York: Norton, 1989), 437.
  • 23. Sandie Eltringham, “LEGO Metrics,” in Sherry Turkle, ed., Falling for Science: Objects in Mind (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008), 150-1.
  • 24. Seth Giddings, “Bright Bricks, Dark Play: On The Impossibility of Studying LEGO,” in Mark Wolf, ed., LEGO Studies: Examining the Building Blocks of a Transmedial Phenomenon (New York: Routledge, 2014), 252.
  • 25. Kevin Schut, “The Virtualization of LEGO,” in Mark Wolf, ed., LEGO Studies: Examining the Building Blocks of a Transmedial Phenomenon (New York: Routledge, 2014), 236.
  • 26. Roger Caillois, Man, Play, and Games, trans. Meyer Barash (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1961).
  • 27. Kevin Schut, “The Virtualization of LEGO,” 235.
  • 28. Seth Giddings, “Bright Bricks, Dark Play,” 256.
  • 29. The LEGO Brand. Available at http://www.lego.com/en-gb/aboutus/ lego-group/theJego_brand (accessed June 3, 2015).
  • 30. Sherry Turkle, Falling for Science: Objects in Mind, 14.
  • 31. Jason Mittell, “Afterword: D.I.Y. Disciplinarity—(Dis)Assembling LEGO Studies for the Academy,” in Mark Wolf, ed. LEGO Studies: Examining the Building Blocks of a Transmedial Phenomenon (New York: Routledge, 2014), 272.
 
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