Notes

  • 1. Alatariel’s Atelier. See http://alatarielatelier.blogspot.se/p/female- minifigure-set.html?zx=7fc735e0789785ac (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 2. Becky Francis, “Gender, Toys and Learning,” Oxford Review of Education 36 (2010): 325-44.
  • 3. Ibid.
  • 4. Ian Sample, “Toys Aimed At Girls ‘Steering Women Away from Science Careers,”’ The Guardian, available at http://www.theguardian.com/ science/2015/sep/04/toys-aimed-at-girls-steering-women-away-from- science-careers (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 5. Sherry Turkle, Objects in Mind (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008).
  • 6. LEGO 21110 Research Institute Building Instructions, available at http://cache.lego.com/bigdownloads/buildinginstructions/6107021.pdf (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 7. Ibid.
  • 8. LEGO Online Shop, available at http://shop.lego.com/en-GB/Research- Institute-21110? (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 9. The World Bank, World Development Report 2012: Gender, Equality and Development, available at https://siteresources.worldbank.org/ INTWDR2012/Resources/7778105-1299699968583/7786210- 1315936222006/Complete-Report.pdf, 88 (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 10. See Rebecca Gutwald, “Girl, LEGO Friends is not your Friend! Does LEGO Construct Gender Stereotypes?” in this book, 103-12.
  • 11. Maaike Lauwaert, “Playing Outside the Box—On LEGO Toys and the Changing World of Construction Play,” History and Technology: An International Journal 24 (2008): 221-37.
  • 12. Ibid.
  • 13. “Lego’s Consistency Has Been the Key to Its Success: Getting Girls was the Tricky Part,” AdWeek, available at http://www.adweek.com/ news/advertising-branding/legos-consistency-has-been-key-its-success- 148553 (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 14. Jodi O’Brien, ed., Encyclopaedia of Gender and Society (London: SAGE, 2009), 359.
  • 15. Becky Francis, “Gender, Toys and Learning,” 332-7.
  • 16. M. Gail Jones, Anne Howe, and Melissa J. Rua, “Gender Differences in Students’ Experiences, Interests, and Attitudes toward Science and Scientists,” Scientific Education 84 (2000): 180-92.
  • 17. David Wade Chambers, “Stereotypical Images of the Scientist: The Draw a Scientist Test,” Science Education 67 (1983): 255-65.
  • 18. See Roy Cook, “Ninjas, Kobe Bryant, and Yellow Plastic: The LEGO Minifigure and Race” in this book, 91-102.
  • 19. LSE Impact of Social Science blog, “Male, Mad and Muddleheaded: The Portrayal of Academics in Children’s Books is Shockingly Narrow,” available at http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/ 2014/02/14/academics-in-childrens-picture-books (accessed February 27, 2017).
  • 20. Francis, “Gender, Toys and Learning,” 329.
  • 21. Emily Martin, “The Egg and the Sperm: How Science has Constructed a Romance Based on Stereotypical Male-Female Roles,” Signs 16 (1991): 489.
 
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