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Home arrow Engineering arrow Measuring Electronic Word-of-Mouth Effectiveness: Developing and Applying the eWOM Trust Scale
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Validity

Generally, construct validity refers to the question of how well a scale actually measures the construct it is intended to measure (Hair, Black, Babin & Anderson, 2010). By referring to Calder, Phillips, and Tybout (1982), Netemeyer et al. (2003) note that construct validity can be best described as any efforts that aim to evaluate the degree to which a measure truly reflects the concept being investigated or efforts that strive to investigate the covariation in and between constructs that can be interpreted in terms of theoretical constructs. In order to assess the validity of a measure, a series of simultaneous tests of hypotheses about the scale and the construct itself are required (Spector, 1992). The following research questions address the various validity types that can be used to establish a valid measurement scale. This thesis’ discussion on validity is guided by Netemeyer et al.’s (2003) understanding and classification, which categorizes the various validity types in accordance with other scholars (e.g., Haynes, Neslon & Baline, 1999; Trochim, 2012). Here, the authors describe three general types of validity: (i) translation validity (i.e., the degree to which a construct is translated into the operationalization of the construct), (ii) criterion validity (i.e., the degree to which the construct’s operationalization behaves the way it should given to theory), and (iii) nomological validity (i.e., the extent to which predictions from a formal theoretical network containing the concept under investigation are confirmed (Campbell, I960)). As the scale’s translation validity is discussed in Chapter 4, the remainder of this section is dedicated to the examination of the measure’s criterion-related and nomological validity.

 
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