Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Engineering arrow Measuring Electronic Word-of-Mouth Effectiveness: Developing and Applying the eWOM Trust Scale
Source

eWOM Trust Consequences

As discussed earlier, trust is a good predictor of behaviours (Gefen et al., 2003; Menon et al., 2002; Pavlou & Fygenson, 2006). Consequently, this thesis argues that a person’s general level of trust in eWOM is likely to determine the level of exposure to this kind of information or, more generally, multiple forms of eWOM usage and message impact. That is, eWOM trust is theorized to determine a person’s amount of information seeking, purchase influence, and information-passing to others. This assumption finds support in prior research that identified a strong trust-behaviour relationship in the eWOM context. For instance, Chen and Hung (2010) find that interpersonal trust in an online community is positively related with informationcollecting behaviour of the members. Additionally, by borrowing from the media dependency theory, Park et al. (2011) argue that online shoppers who used online reviews are more often and more willing to use and adopt online reviews, which can be regarded as a form of trusting behaviour.

Simultaneously, there is a growing body of literature supporting a negative relationship between attitude towards market communications and volitional exposure to this kind of information. That is, a person who is striving to reduce cognitive dissonance and has minor trust in eWOM will align his/her mental structures accordingly (i.e., hold a negative attitude, motivation towards OCR) and will also be reluctant to use this information. For these people, eWOM represents a burden or alienating thing. This is well supported in the advertising context (e.g., Abernethy, 1991; Cronin & Menelly, 1992). Here, it is generally agreed that consumers show ad-avoidance behaviours (e.g., “zipping” TV commercials) when they have a negative attitude towards advertising in general. Similarly well supported seems to be the inverted relationship between trusting beliefs and ad avoidance (Soh, 2007). For instance, consumers are more likely to spend more time looking at advertisements if they have positive perceptions of their trustworthiness (James & Kover, 1992). The same seems to be true in the opposite direction (Lee & Lumking, 1992), as it is assumed that the same behaviours apply to the eWOM context. eWOM avoidance is defined as the consumer’s intentional behaviour to skip or bypass online review-conveyed information. In accordance with above discussion, the following research questions are asked:

H14: A person’s trust in eWOM is significantly and positively related to eWOM

information usage (a: eWOM influence; b: eWOM seeking; c: eWOM passing).

H15: A person’s trust in eWOM is significantly and negatively related to eWOM

avoidance.

 
Source
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Political science
Philosophy
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel