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Home arrow Engineering arrow Measuring Electronic Word-of-Mouth Effectiveness: Developing and Applying the eWOM Trust Scale
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Convergent Validity

According to Bagozzi and Yi (1991) and others (Anderson & Gerbing, 1988; Fomell & Larcker, 1981; MacKenzie et al., 2011), weak evidence for convergent validity is given by significant factor loading on an item under investigation. A stricter assessment of convergent validity is provided by the evaluation of the squared factor loading. That is, if the squared factor loading is greater than .50 - meaning that the majority of the total variation in the measure is attributable to the latent construct - convergent validity can be assumed. In both samples, all factor loadings (X) were greater than .60 and showed t-values greater than 2.57 (ranging from 9.15 (10.39) to 20.91 (20.82)), implying a significant loading on their intended sub-dimensions on the .01 significance level. Additionally, 20 (18) of the 25 items had squared factor loadings (X2) above the required threshold of .50, whereas two of the items (in both samples) almost reached this limit. Similarly, the validity of each first-order sub-dimension as indicators of the second-order construct was tested. All five factor loadings were considerably high and significant (ranges of t-values: 8.66 (7.96) to 17.82 (15.61)). Four out of five first-order constructs turned out to have a squared factor loading (y) greater than .50. However, the loading on the benevolence dimension was problematic (average у = .29). Convergent validity can also be evaluated by assessing the extent to which the first-order constructs are correlated (Bagozzi and Yi 1991). All correlations in both samples turned out to be considerable (ranging from .45 (.39) to .78 (.65)) and significantly related (p < .05) (see Table 21). This implies that all factors measure a specific aspect of the same construct; supporting convergent validity.

 
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