Successful Technique No. 2

This technique is for those people who feel more comfortable with trying to find out what an interviewing or hiring authority might be interested in before they talk about their experience. I offer this technique because it does work in some situations. I really don't like it as well and never have. But it has been successful for lots of candidates over the years. So I will offer it.

It isn't much different than the first technique. It asks the question: "What would you like to find in the ideal candidate?" before the candidate talks about his or her intangible attributes and experiences and background. It works like this:

You sit down in the interviewing or hiring authority's office, take a deep breath and say:

Phase 1: (as you put the legal pad down in front of you) "Tell me, Mr. or Ms _, what kind of candidate would you ideally like to find?" (As the hiring or interviewing authority speaks, you take notes about what he's looking for in an ideal candidate. You may ask a number of questions, but the idea is to find out, in the employer's words, what he's looking for.)

Phase 2: "If you will allow me, Mr. or Ms._, I would like to explain why I would fit what you are looking for and how I could do the job.

First of all, I am_(ten or twelve descriptive adjectives that describe your work ethic)."

Transition phrase 1. "Based on what you said you wanted in a candidate, I would like to demonstrate where these features have been benefits to the people that I've worked for, in the light of what you need."

Phase 3: "I am presently (or most recently have been) at_______ company. I function for them in the capacity of:__(a thorough description of a exactly what you do, how you do it, for whom you do it, and how successful you are—in terms a high-school senior could understand)_(you then emphasize how much you love the job and the company and the reason you have to leave or why you left... in very positive terms)." Tell a story, if appropriate.

"And before that, I was at_______ company. There, I functioned in the capacity of_(a thorough description of exactly what you did, how you did it, who you did it for, and how successful you were—in terms a high-school senior could understand) _(you then emphasize how much you loved that job and why you had to leave it. . . in very positive terms)." Tell a story, if appropriate.

"And before that, I was at_______ company. There I functioned in the capacity of_(a thorough description of exactly what you did, how you did it, who you did it for, and how successful you were—in terms a high-school senior could understand) _(you then emphasize how much you loved that job and why you had to leave it ... in very positive terms)." Tell a story, if appropriate.

(Continue in this manner for at least three jobs, if you have that many. If you've had a series of short stints at jobs—like more than one in the last the year or less—you may want to go back further than three jobs.)

The only difference between this and the first technique that I mentioned, it is that you might be able to be more specific about the things that the employer wants in a candidate, in the descriptions of the jobs that you had. So you may have a little bit of an advantage over the first technique.

Phase 4: "Based on what you said you wanted, I'm excellent match. What do I need to do to get the job?"

The slight advantage that you might have in using this technique is that you will get a really good idea about what the employer is looking for. The advantage of this technique does not, I believe, offset the drawbacks. The major drawback to this technique is that once the interviewing or hiring authority starts talking about the position and starts asking you questions, you may not get the chance to "take control" by talking about your features, advantages, and benefits—and the successes that you had in your previous jobs. The technique does work, but I don't think it is as consistently successful as the first one. Do what you and your coach think is best.

 
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