Notes

  • 1. Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, transl. A.M. Sheridan Smith (New York: Pantheon, 1972), pp. 45.
  • 2. Ian Hacking, Historical Ontology (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002), p. 90. Hacking was probably referring to this passage: “Et c’est lui qui a rendu possibles ces individualites que nous appelons Hobbes, ou Berkeley, ou Hume, ou Condillac.” “Individualities” is too awkward for English use; “individuals,” which we find in the English translation, misses Foucault’s obvious attempt to depersonalize individual thinkers, while Hacking’s “figure” nicely captures it. Michel Foucault, Les mots et les choses: Une archeologie des sciences humaines (Editions Gallimard, 1966), p. 77; The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences, transl. A.M. Sheridan Smith (New York: Pantheon Books, 1971), p. 70.
  • 3. Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 45.
  • 4. See James Der Derian; “Critical encounters in international relations”; International Social Science Journal, 59(191) (2009): 69-73.
  • 5. James Der Derian and Michael J. Shapiro, eds., International/Intertextual Relations: Postmodern Readings of World Politics (Lexington: Lexington Books, 1989).
  • 6. Michael Barnett and Raymond Duvall, “Power in International Politics,” International Organization, 59(1) (2005): 57.
  • 7. Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, transl. Alan Sheridan (New York: Vintage Books, 1979), p. 194; scare marks in text.
  • 8. Michel Foucault, Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France, 1977-1978, transl. Graham Burchill (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007); Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the College de France, 1978-1979, transl. Graham Burchill (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008).
  • 9. Jan Selby, “Engaging Foucault: Discourse, Liberal Governance and the Limits of Foucauldian IR,” International Relations, 27(3) (2007): 334.
  • 10. Brent J. Steele, Defacing Power: The Aesthetics of Insecurity in Global Politics (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2012), is a conspicuous exception.
  • 11. Michel Foucault, Society Must Be Defended: Lectures at the College de France, 1975-1976, transl. David Macey (New York: Picador, 2003), p. 11.
  • 12. Foucault, The Order of Things, p. 183.
  • 13. Ibid., p. 19.
  • 14. Constantin Fasolt, The Limits of History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004), pp. 16-39.
  • 15. Foucault, The Order of Things, p. 20.
  • 16. Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 49.
  • 17. Ibid., pp. 237, 288.
  • 18. Ibid., pp. 340-7.
  • 19. Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 46.
  • 20. Ibid., p. 148.
  • 21. Gary Gutting, Michel Foucault’s Archaeology of Scientific R.eason (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989), pp. 178-9.
  • 22. Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 175.
  • 23. Ibid.
  • 24. Foucault, The Order of Things, ch. 3-5.
  • 25. Ibid., p. 272.
  • 26. Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, pp. 192, 193.
  • 27. Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, transl. Robert Hurley (New York: Pantheon, 1978), p. 80.
  • 28. See especially ibid., p. 143 on its rupture and the emergence of “modern man.”
  • 29. Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 193.
  • 30. Foucault, Security, Territory, Population, lecture nine, p. 237.
  • 31. Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics, lecture one, p. 22.
  • 32. Foucault, Security, Territory, Population, lecture five, p. 115.
  • 33. Foucault, The History of Sexuality, p. 144. See Ben Golder and Peter Fitzpatrick, Foucault’s Law (Abingdon: Routledge, 2009), pp. 34-9, for discussion.
  • 34. Michel Foucault, Care of the Self, Volume 3 of the History of Sexuality, transl. Robert Hurley (New York: Pantheon, 1986), pp. 65, 67.
  • 35. Foucault, Care of the Self, p. 67.
  • 36. Michel Foucault, “A Preface to Transgression,” in Language, CounterMemory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1977), pp. 34-5.
  • 37. Michel Foucault, “Preface to the 1961 edition,” History ofMadness, transl. Jonathan Murphy and Jean Khalfa (Abingdon: Routledge, 2006), xxxiii.
  • 38. Ian Hacking, “Foreword,” in Foucault, History of Madness, p. xi.
  • 39. Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 129; L’archeologie du savoir, p. 170.
 
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