Notes

  • 1. Fredric Jameson, Brecht and Method (New York: Verso, 2011), p. 2.
  • 2. Michel Foucault, Dits et Ecrits VolII. (Paris: Gallimard, 1970-1975), 523 (my translation).
  • 3. Graham Burchell, Colin Gordon, and Peter Miller (eds), The Foucault Effect (London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1991).
  • 4. The quotations are from: Michel Foucault, “Of Other Spaces” on the web at http://foucault.info/documents/heterotopia/foucault.heterotopia.en. html (verified on October 5, 2015).
  • 5. Jameson, Brecht and Method, p. 11.
  • 6. Michel Foucault, The Use of Pleasure transl. Robert Hurley (New York: Pantheon, 1985), p. 3.
  • 7. Michel Foucault, Security, Territory, Population, transl. Graham Burchell (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), pp. 116-118.
  • 8. See Michel Foucault, The History ofSexuality, transl. Robert Hurley (New York: Vintage, 2012).
  • 9. See Michel Foucault, “About the Concept of the ‘Dangerous Individual’ in 19th-Century Psychiatry,” International Journal ofLaw and Psychiatry, 1(1) (1978) On the web at http://schwarzemilch.files.wordpress.com/2009/ 02/foucault_dangerous_individual.pdf (verified on October 5, 2015).
  • 10. Foucault, Security, Territory, Population, p. 79.
  • 11. Michael J. Shapiro, Studies in Trans-Disciplinary Method: After the Aesthetic Turn (New York: Routledge, 2012), pp. 20-21.
  • 12. See Colin Tatz, “The Politics of Aboriginal Health,” Politics (The Journal of the Australian Political Studies Association) 7(2) (November, 1972): 8.
  • 13. Foucault, The History ofSexuality, p. 25.
  • 14. The quotations are from Marc Djaballah’s thorough analysis of the Kantian influence on Foucault: Kant, Foucault, and Forms of Experience (New York: Routledge, 2008), p. 163. For Foucault’s elaboration of the critical attitude, see Michel Foucault, “What is Enlightenment,” in Paul Rabinow ed. The Foucault Reader (New York: Pantheon, 1984), pp. 32-50.
  • 15. Foucault’s focus on the statement, a turn away from phenomenology, is emphasized in Deleuze’s treatment of Foucault. See Gilles Deleuze, Foucault transl. Sean Hand (Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1988), p. 49.
  • 16. Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, transl. A. M. Sheridan Smith (New York: Pantheon, 1972), p. 45.
  • 17. Ibid., p. 47.
  • 18. Michel Foucault, The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception, transl. A. M. Sheridan Smith (New York: Pantheon, 1973), p. xii.
  • 19. Ibid., p. 25.
  • 20. Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolities, transl. G. Burchell (New York: Palgrave, 2008), p. 3.
  • 21. Ibid., p. 4.
  • 22. Ibid., pp. 94-95.
  • 23. Michael J. Shapiro, War Crimes: Atrocity, Justice and the Archives (Cambridge, UK: Polity, 2014).
  • 24. Mathias Enard, Zone, transl. Charlotte Mandell (Rochester, NY: Open Letter, 2010), pp. 72-73.
  • 25. Michel Foucault, “The Confession of the Flesh,” A conversation in Colin Gordon ed. Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews & Other Writings 1972-1977, transl. Colin Gordon, Leo Marshall, John Mepham and Kate Soper (New York: Pantheon, 1977), p. 194.
  • 26. Gilles Deleuze, “What is a Dispositif,” in Two Regimes of Madness,” transl. Ames Hodges and Mike Taormina (New York: Semiotext(e), 2006), p. 342.
  • 27. Giorgio Agamben, What is an Apparatus? transl. David Kishik and Stefan Pedatella (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009), p. 14.
  • 28. See Alfred Hoche, Arztliche Bemerkungen in Karl Binding and Alfred Hoche, De Freigabe der Vernichtung Lebensunwerten Lebens: Ihr Mass und ihre Form (Leipzig, 1920), pp. 61-62.
  • 29. The notion of crimes against humanity in fact pre-dated the pre-trial Nuremberg negotiations. It was evoked in 1906 by E. D. Morel, in reference to the atrocities in the “The Congo Free State.” In his History of the Congo Reform Movement, he refers to King Leopold II of Belgium’s conduct in the Congo as “a great crime against humanity.” Quoted in William Roger Louis and Jean Stengers, eds. E. D. Morel’s History of The Congo Reform Movement (Oxford, UK: The Clarendon Press, 1968), p. 167.
  • 30. Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, transl. Alan Sheridan (New York: Pantheon, 1977), p. 34.
  • 31. Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics, p. 36.
  • 32. Michel Foucault, “What is Critique,” in The Politics of Truth transl. Lysa Hochroth & Catherine Porter (New York: Semiotext(e), 2007), p. 63.
  • 33. Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics, p. 36.
  • 34. Enard, Zone, p. 75.
  • 35. Walter Benjamin, The Arcades Project, transl. H. Eiland and K. McLaughlin (Cambridge, MA; Harvard University Press, 2002), p. 460.
  • 36. Enard, Zone, pp. 21-22.
  • 37. That characterization of Foucault belongs to Gilles Deleuze in his Foucault, pp. 23-44.
  • 38. Michel Houllebecq, The Map and the Territory, transl. Gavin Bowd (London: William Heinemann, 2011), p. 98.
  • 39. Enard, Zone, p. 23.
  • 40. Michel Foucault, Fearless Speech, ed. Joseph Pearson (New York: Semiotext(e), 2001), p. 19.
  • 41. Michel Foucault, Society Must Be Defended, transl. David Macey (New York: Picador, 2003), pp. 54-55.
  • 42. Michel Foucault, “What is Critique?”, p. 47.
  • 43. Charles Bowden and Alice Leora Briggs, Dreamland: The Way out of Juarez (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010).
  • 44. Bowden and Briggs, Dreamland, p. 2.
  • 45. Ibid., p. 6.
  • 46. Ibid., pp. 138-139.
  • 47. Deleuze, Foucault, p. 26.
  • 48. Ibid., p. 27.
  • 49. Ibid., p. 36.
  • 50. Michel Foucault, “Questions on Geography,” transl. Colin Gordon, Leo Marshall, John Mepham, and Kate Soper in Colin Gordon ed. Power/ Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings (New York: Pantheon, 1980), p. 68.
  • 51. D. A, Miller, The Novel and the Police (Berkeley CA: University of California Press, 1988).
  • 52. Simon During, Foucault and Literature: Towards a genealogy of writing (New York: Routledge, 1992), p. 197.
  • 53. This is the argument of Paul Veyne who has internalized Foucault’s method for treating discourse and other genres of representation in his Writing History: Essay on Epistemology, transl. Mina Moore-Rinvolucri (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1984).
  • 54. Salman Rushdie, Shalimar the Clown (New York: Random House, 2005), 71.
  • 55. Ibid., p. 12.
  • 56. Michel Foucault, “Of Other Spaces,” at http://foucault.info/docu- ments/heteroTopia/foucault.heteroTopia.en.html. (Retrieved September 9, 2012).
  • 57. Ibid.
  • 58. Michel Foucault, “The Concern for Truth,” in Foucault Live, transl. John Johnston (New York: Semiotext(e), 1989), p. 305.
  • 59. See Michel Foucault and Maurice Blanchot: Michel Foucault: Maurice Blanchot: The Thought from Outside/Maurice Blanchot: Michel Foucault as I Imagine Him, transl. Jeffrey Mehlman and Brain Massumi (New York: Zone Books, 1987).
  • 60. The quotation is from Ann Smock’s “Translator’s Introduction,” in Maurice Blanchot, The Space ofLiterature (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1982), p. 3.
  • 61. The quotation is from Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, p. 177.
  • 62. Gayatri Spivak, An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012), p. 317.

63. Shoshana Felman, The Juridical Unconscious: Trials and Traumas of the twentieth Century (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002),

p. 8.

  • 64. Michel Foucault, “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History,” in Donald F. Bouchard ed. Language, Counter-Memory, Practice, transl. Sherry Simons (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977), p. 139.
  • 65. Foucault, The Use of Pleasure, p. 26. Here I am following the critical discussion of Foucault’s aestheticization of ethics by Jane Bennett, “‘How is it Then That We Still Remain Barbarians’: Foucault, Schiller, and the Aestheticization of Ethics,” Political Theory 24(4) (1996): 653-672.
  • 66. The quotations are from Bennett, Ibid.: 654.
  • 67. Ibid.: 663.
  • 68. Foucault, The Use of Pleasure, p. 31.
 
Source
< Prev   CONTENTS   Source   Next >