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Which federal judges have been impeached?

The following judges have been impeached as of 2010.

1803: John Pickering, U.S. District Court for the District of New Hampshire (impeached by House and convicted by the Senate).

1804-1805: Samuel Chase, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (impeached by the House in 1804 and acquitted by the Senate in 1805).

1830: James H. Peck, U.S. District Court for the District of Missouri (impeached by the House and acquitted by the Senate).

1862: West H. Humphreys, U.S. District Court for the Middle, Eastern and Western Districts of Tennessee (impeached by House and convicted in the Senate).

1873: Mark H. Delahay, U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas (impeached by the House and resigned before trial in the Senate).

1904: Charles Swayne, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida (impeached by the House and acquitted in the Senate).

1912: Robert W. Archbald, U.S. Commerce Court (impeached by the House and convicted by the Senate).

1926: George W. English, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Illinois (impeached by the House and resigned from office).

1933: Harold Louderback, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California (impeached by the House and acquitted by the Senate).

1936: Halsted L. Ritter, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida (impeached by the House and convicted by the Senate).

1986: Harry E. Claiborne, U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada (impeached by the House and convicted in the Senate).

1988: Alcee L. Hastings, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida (impeached by the House and convicted in the Senate).

1989: Walter L. Nixon, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi (impeached by the House and convicted by the Senate).

THE SUPREME COURT TERM

When does the U.S. Supreme Court meet?

The U.S. Supreme Court convenes the first Monday of October for the start of its new term. The Court's term usually ends at the end of June. Federal law, codified at 28 U.S.C. section 2 provides: "The Supreme Court shall hold at the seat of government a term of court commencing on the first Monday in October of each year and may hold such adjourned or special terms as may be necessary."

When did the Court originally begin its new terms?

The Judiciary Act of 1789 provided that the Court's terms shall begin the first Monday of February and the first Monday of August. The first meeting of the Court occurred on February 2, 1790.

Does the Court ever meet outside of its traditional term time?

Yes, the Court sometimes holds special sessions in important cases. For example, the Court held a special session on July 19, 1942, to hear the case of Ex Parte Quirin to determine whether alleged German saboteurs were entitled to a federal habeas corpus review of their military commission convictions. More recently, the Court called a special session to hear the case of McConnell v. Federal Election Commission in September 2003. The case involved a major First Amendment challenge to the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, a federal law restricting soft money spending and other funding restrictions in political elections.

How do justices get on the U.S. Supreme Court?

The president of the United States nominates or appoints U.S. Supreme Court justices. However, the U.S. Senate confirms the nominees or appointees by majority vote. In recent years, most persons nominated for service on the U.S. Supreme Court have served as lower federal court judges. However, nothing requires a person to have had prior judicial experience before serving on the U.S. Supreme Court. For example, former Associate Justice and later Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist had never served on the Court before his appointment by President Richard Nixon as associate justice in 1972.

 
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