Household Income and College Degree

The first series in Figure 3.9 pictures our data on that relationship by giver types (a=Planned, b=Habitual, c=Selective, d=Impulsive),

controlling for all the other social status characteristics described previously.13 Household income is depicted along the x-axis and covers the entire range of 19 income brackets, with the lowest bracket on the left and the highest on the right. Attainment of a four-year college degree is depicted by the different lines. The y-axis represents the predicted probabilities for being a giver of each type based upon the varying education and income levels.

The results in Figure 3.9(a) show that being a Planned giver is:

  • • More likely for Americans with a college degree than those without (10 percentage point gap).
  • • Fairly unrelated to income level (the association is small, as shown by the relative flatness of both lines).

Thus having a college degree makes someone significantly more likely to be a Planned giver.

As Figure 3.9(b) illustrates, being a Habitual giver is:

  • • More likely for Americans with higher income levels than those with lower income.
  • • Fairly unrelated to college degree status (the two lines representing different education levels are very close to each other and overlap in places).

Thus the likelihood of being a Habitual giver is largely distinguished by income: the greater the household income, the greater the chance of someone being a Habitual giver.

Impulsive giver results pictured in Figure 3.9(d) are similar to those of Habitual givers. Being an Impulsive giver is:

  • • More likely for Americans with higher income levels than those with lower income.
  • • Fairly unrelated to college degree status.

There appears to be a moderate relationship of college degree with income level in predicting Impulsive giver types: an American with a high income and no college degree has a larger probability of being an Impulsive giver than one with the same high income and a college degree. Conversely an American with a low income and a college degree has a slightly higher probability of being an Impulsive giver than one with a low income and no college degree.

The relationship between household income level and college degree attainment is similar for Habitual and Impulsive givers: higher incomes relate to a greater likelihood of being either a Habitual or Impulsive giver. The relationship between household income level and college degree attainment for Planned givers is different: college degree status is a key differentiator, regardless of income level. There was no difference between the interaction of income and college degree for Selective and Atypical givers.

 
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