Notes

  • 1. Chika Unigwe, In the Shadow of Ala. Igbo Women Writing as an Act of Righting. Ph.D. Thesis. Leiden University, 2004, 140 (Unigwe 2004).
  • 2. Jack Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003, 11 (Donnelly 2003).
  • 3. Chika Unigwe, On Black Sisters’ Street. London: Vintage, 2009 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 4. United Nations, “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” www.un. org/en/documents/udhr/ (Accessed October 5, 2011) (United Nations 2015a).
  • 5. Marie-Benedicte Dembour, “What Are Human Rights? Four Schools of Thought,” Human Rights Quarterly, 32.1 (2010): 2-4.
  • 6. Unigwe, Black Sisters, 78 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 7. Ibid., 247.
  • 8. Ibid., 32-35.
  • 9. United Nations, 1948.
  • 10. Unigwe, Black Sisters, 42 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 11. Ibid., 120.
  • 12. Louis Althusser, Lenin and Philosophy. Trans. Ben Brewster. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1971, 170-177 (Althusser 1971).
  • 13. Unigwe, Black Sisters, 182 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 14. Ibid., 190.
  • 15. Ibid., 231.
  • 16. To be sure, I do not mean to conflate “internationalism” with “universal- ism. ” I think, however, that the idea that the concern for the dignity of the body cuts across boundaries of ethnicity and race is precisely what the “universal” in the UDHR means.
  • 17. Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth. Trans. Constance Farrington. London: Penguin Books, 1967, 127 (Fanon 1967).
  • 18. Unigwe, Black Sisters, 21 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 19. Ibid., 23.
  • 20. Ibid., 33.
  • 21. Ibid., 245-246.
  • 22. Ibid., 245.
  • 23. Ibid., 278.
  • 24. Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985, 19 (Scarry 1985).
  • 25. Ibid., 212 (emphasis in original).
  • 26. Ibid., 213.
  • 27. Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998 (Arendt 1998).
  • 28. Martha Nussbaum, “Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism,” in For Love of Country: Debating the Limits of Patriotism, ed. Joshua Cohen. Boston: Beacon Press, 1996, 4 (Nussbaum 1996).
  • 29. Unigwe, Black Sisters, 173 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 30. Margaret Atwood, “Why We Tell Stories.” 2010. Big Think. www.bigthink. com/ideas/24259 (Accessed June 3, 2012) (Atwood 2010).
  • 31. Martha Nussbaum, Love’s Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990, 5 (Nussbaum 1990).
  • 32. See also Wolfgang Iser, The Act of Reading: A Theory of Aesthetic Response. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1978 (Iser 1978).
  • 33. Amanda Anderson, The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Culture of Theory. Princeton University Press, 2006, 118 (Anderson 2006).
  • 34. Ibid., 122.
  • 35. Terry Eagleton, After Theory. New York: Basic Books, 2003, 143 (Eagleton 2003).
  • 36. Richard Priebe, “Literature, Community, and Violence: Reading African Literature in the West, Post-9/11,” Research in African Literatures, 36.2 (2005): 48 (Priebe 2005).
  • 37. Unigwe, Black Sisters, 293 (Unigwe 2009).
  • 38. Ibid., 180.
  • 39. Ibid., 132.
  • 40. Ibid., 47.
  • 41. Ibid., 134.
  • 42. Ibid., 75.
  • 43. Simon Baron-Cohen, Zero Degrees of Empathy: A New Theory of Human Cruelty. New York: Allen Lane, 2011, 4-9.
  • 44. Ibid., 289.
  • 45. Ibid., 290.
  • 46. United Nations, “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” www.un. org/en/documents/udhr/.
  • 47. Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own. New York: A Harvest Book, 1989 (original 1929), 76 (Woolf 1989).
  • 48. Ibid., 77.
  • 49. Unigwe, In the Shadow of Ala, 2 (Unigwe 2004).
  • 50. Ibid., 11.
  • 51. Ibid., 17.
  • 52. Ibid., 26.
  • 53. Ibid., 140.
  • 54. Alan Riding, “Rap and Film at the Louvre? What’s Up With That? ” The New York Times, 2006. www.nytimes.com/2006/11/21/books/21morr.html (Accessed 5 October 2011) (Riding 2006).
 
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