Following a Teacher’s Mathematical and Scientific Noticing Across Career Progression from Field Experiences to Classroom Teaching

Julie M. Amador, Ingrid Carter, Rick A. Hudson and Enrique Galindo

Abstract In this study, we focus on one preservice teacher’s noticing of students’ mathematical and scientific thinking with an emphasis on how the acts of attending and interpreting can influence decisions about pedagogical actions. The study centers on an innovative field experience approach that incorporates lesson study in order to emphasize students’ thinking and its impact. Consequently, we were interested in understanding how one teacher made decisions based on her noticing at three points in her career: preservice field experiences, student teaching, and her first-year teaching. We used a case study approach to focus on one preservice teacher. Findings indicate that scaffolding PSTs to notice students’ mathematical and scientific thinking influenced how she noticed and considered students’ thinking while teaching. Results further indicate that supporting the development of noticing during field experiences has a positive impact on a teacher when she was in her own classroom. The study provides a unique contribution to the field as it incorporates both the mathematics and science teaching practices of the same PST from her teacher education experience into her career.

Keywords Field experience Lesson study Student teaching Mathematics Science [1] [2]

What teachers perceive about students’ thinking during the act of teaching and the subsequent choices about how they respond provide rich insights into the thinking of teachers. Although the benefits of focusing on students’ mathematical and scientific thinking have been shown to be an important component of teacher education (Driver, Guesne, & Tiberghien, 2000; Sowder, 2007), relatively few studies have examined the long-term impact of teacher education programs that emphasize the thinking of children. In this chapter, we describe a study that examines a preservice teacher who participated in an experimental field-based course as part of the Iterative Model Building (IMB) project. Using case study methodology, we document the impact of one preservice teacher’s noticing on field experiences, her initial practice as a student teacher, and her first-year teaching.

  • [1] J.M. Amador (H) University of Idaho, Coeur d’Alene, ID, USAe-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it
  • [2] Carter Metropolitan State University of Denver, Denver, CO, USAe-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it R.A. Hudson University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN, USAe-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it E. Galindo Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USAe-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it © Springer International Publishing AG 2017 161 E.O. Schack et al. (eds.), Teacher Noticing: Bridging and BroadeningPerspectives, Contexts, and Frameworks, Research in Mathematics Education, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-46753-5_10
 
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