Wildlife Trafficking: Harms and Victimization

Jennifer Maher and Ragnhild Sollund

Introduction

In this chapter, we present and discuss findings from an empirical case study on the illegal wildlife trade (IWT) carried out in Norway, the UK, Colombia, and Brazil. This book focuses on the European

We are grateful for initial funding for the project; this research is based upon from The Norwegian Animal Protection Fund.

J. Maher (*)

Faculty of Business and Society, Lecturer and Subject Leader in Criminology, South Wales, UK

e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it R. Sollund

University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it

© The Author(s) 2016

R. Sollund et al. (eds.), Fighting Environmental Crime in Europe and Beyond, Palgrave Studies in Green Criminology,

DOI 10.1057/978-1-349-95085-0_5

Union (EU), therefore, special attention is given to the UK and Norway. We utilize data from the European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime (EFFACE) (2016) project (Maher and Sollund 2016; Sollund and Maher 2015) to demonstrate the harms associated with IWT and explain why endangered animals and animal products are trafficked. We also identify offenders, their role in the trade, and the punishment received. Crucially, our emphasis is on the direct victims of the trade, the animals themselves, whether they are trafficked dead or alive.

 
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