Questions to be answered

  • • In the process, which activities add more value to the results?
  • - Basic activities
  • - Critical but not basic activities
  • • Are there any redundant steps that cause waste and time losses?
  • • Are there any repetitions and overlaps?
  • • Are there any deficiencies or inabilities in inputs?
  • • Can we reduce the control points and approvals?
  • • Do the process outputs coincide with the objectives?

As a result of the analysis, to keep business processes in line with the designated targets, the aim is to identify and refine unnecessary activities and in this way a base is formed for improvement suggestions. Typically the value- added period is 3% of the total time! (However, still most of the development efforts are focused on the value-added period.)

Documentation of processes

  • • Process description card (Figure 5.15)
  • • Main processes chart (Figure 5.16)
  • • Supplier-Input-Process-Output-Customer (SIPOC) (Figure 5.17)
  • • Process flow diagram (Figure 5.18)
  • • Functional flow chart (Figure 5.19)
  • • Value map (Figure 5.20)
  • • Spaghetti diagram (Figure 5.21)

Outputs

  • • Process relationship map
  • • Process simplification suggestions
  • • Necessary conditions for quick and productive processes
  • • Process responsibilities and authorities matrices
  • • Process roles and job descriptions
Main processes chart—example

Figure 5.15 Process description card.

Figure 5.16 Main processes chart—example.

Supplier-Input-Process-Output-Customer (SIPOC)—example

Figure 5.17 Supplier-Input-Process-Output-Customer (SIPOC)—example.

Process flow diagram—example

Figure 5.18 Process flow diagram—example.

Value map—example

Figure 5.19 Functional flow chart—example.

Figure 5.20 Value map—example.

Spaghetti diagram—example

Figure 5.21 Spaghetti diagram—example.

 
Source
< Prev   CONTENTS   Source   Next >