Materials Handling Planning—Systematic Handling Analysis

The goal is to document plan to capture material handling cost savings from the improved layout. An example quantified materials flow diagram on an improved layout, using SHA methodology, is illustrated in Figure 6.7. Every transport and handling of material should, wherever possible, move material to meet ten considerations (see more in Muther and Haganas 1969):

  • 1. Move material toward completion—without back tracking or counter flow.
  • 2. Move material on the same device—without transfers.
  • 3. Move material smoothly and quickly—without confusion or delays, unnecessary handling and awkward positioning or placing.
  • 4. Move material over the shortest distance—without long trips.
  • 5. Move material easily—without rehandling or extra motions.
  • 6. Move material safely—without damage to people, materials, or equipment.
Quantified materials flow diagram—example. Source-. Muther, R., and Haganas, K. Systematic handling analysis. Management and Industrial Research Publications, Kansas City, MO, 1969

Figure 6.7 Quantified materials flow diagram—example. Source-. Muther, R., and Haganas, K. Systematic handling analysis. Management and Industrial Research Publications, Kansas City, MO, 1969.

  • 7. Move material conveniently—without undue physical effort.
  • 8. Move material economically—without breaking bulk units or making several trips where one would do; combining many small units into one large one.
  • 9. Move material to coordinate with production—without causing production workers extra time and effort by hand handling, bending, or reaching.
  • 10. Move material to coordinate with other handling—without a large amount of different handling equipment that cannot be integrated.

A typical output of SHA should be as shown in Figure 6.8.

 
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