Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Political science arrow Global Governance from Regional Perspectives: A Critical View
Source

Illustrations of Relational Governance in Africa

Issue I: African Agency in Global Governance

The relational governance approach is reflected in the way that African actors exercise agency—conceived as the autonomy Africans and their lawful representatives (governments) have to define, act, own, control, and lead on global issues that affect them at the international level (Tieku 2013). Relational governance ideas encouraged African actors to engage in coalition politics in the form of South-South cooperation in global fora. In the World Trade Organization (WTO) system, for instance, African actors formed the Africa Group (AG), which allows them to develop common African positions, strategy, and negotiation teams during major global trade-related negotiations. Even African government representatives' management of the day-to-day work of the WTO is done primarily through the AG. The representatives meet every Tuesday morning to strategize and plan for the week.[1]

Similarly, African governments have often taken advantage of their numerical strength—the African continent comprises fifty-four of the 193 independent states recognized by the United Nations (UN)—and the support from like-minded Southern counterparts to promote their interests to contribute to setting agendas in the UN framework. It is not mere coincidence that Africa-related issues dominate the UN's discussion and activities. For instance, over 60 per cent of UN Security Council discussions and 60 per cent of UN peacekeeping operations focus on Africa. Certainly, Africa dominates the UN agenda because of the nature of its peace and security challenges and the pressure exerted by former colonial powers within the UN framework to promote their interests in Africa, but also in part because the politics of coalition enables African actors to attract greater attention to their cause. African actors have used coalition politics to protect governing elites from external rebuke, to generate and capture material resources and moral power.

  • [1] For discussion of the nature and impact of the coalition politics that African states play in theglobal trading system, see Lee 2012.
 
Source
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Political science
Philosophy
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel