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AND FINALLY

There are thousands of published scales. Whatever you’re interested in, the chances are good that someone has developed and tested a scale to measure it. Scales are not automatically portable—a scale that measures stress among Barbadian women may not measure stress among Ghanaian men—but it makes sense to seek out any published scales on variables you’re studying. You may be able to adapt the scales to your needs, or you may get ideas for building and testing an alternative scale. Just because scales are not perfectly transportable across time and cultures doesn’t mean those scales are useless to you (Further Reading: scales and scaling).

FURTHER READING

Measuring SES: Cirino et al. (2002); Ensminger and Fothergill (2003); Oakes and Rossi (2003). Guttman scaling: Goodenough (1963); Graves et al. (1969); Liao and Tu (2006); Maitra and Schen- sul (2002); Wutich and Ragsdale (2008).

Semantic differential: Arnold-Cathalifaud et al. (2008); Montiel and Boehnke (2000); Turnage (2008).

Ladder of life: Gallicchio et al. (2009); Suhail and Cochrane (1997).

Faces scale: Pasero (1997); Suhail and Chaudhry (2004).

Scales and scaling: Beere (1990); Coombs (1964); Dunn-Rankin (2004); D. C. Miller and Salkind (2002); Netemeyer et al. (2003); Nunnally and Bernstein (1994); Torgerson (1958).

 
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