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Spatial Distribution of Ceramic Styles

As already discussed, there were two main occupational periods in the main complex. However, the later period was represented by the deposition of an artificial clay layer to resurface the floor. For this reason, the

Detail showing the excavations in the isolated rectangular kallanka structure

Figure 5.9. Detail showing the excavations in the isolated rectangular kallanka structure.

Bar graph showing the frequency distribution of the distinct ceramic styles found in the Oroncota building complex

Figure 5.10. Bar graph showing the frequency distribution of the distinct ceramic styles found in the Oroncota building complex.

spatial analysis of the pottery distribution focused only on the early occupational period. Even though utilitarian vessels were ubiquitous, the dominant decorated pottery was the local Yampara style (Table 5.2; Figure

5.10). This style was preponderant in the isolated kallanka hall, outside the main gate of the complex, and in the Twin Kallankas. By comparison, Inka-imported ceramics (decorated Inka Cuzco and Pacajes Inka) were limited in distribution and, as discussed, were only found in the residential compound. Therefore, it is likely that Inka imperial pottery was exclusively used by the center administrators as a sign of status and social distinction. Given their high value, the vessels were not dispensed in the center public celebrations. This contrasted with the near absence of ceramics with lowland influence such as the Thick Rims, Incised and Stamped tradition.

As for function, utilitarian pottery for storing and food-processing vessels was dominant in the site (Figures 5.11 and 5.12). Two exceptions were Room-9 (one of the elaborate rooms) and the area outside the entryway of

Bar graph showing the frequency distribution of serving vessels in the Oroncota building complex

Figure 5.11. Bar graph showing the frequency distribution of serving vessels in the Oroncota building complex.

the main complex. In both areas, roughly half of the ceramics were made up of serving vessels, which underscores their involvement in feasting activities (Table 5.3).

 
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