Practices of Top Performers

Top performers do not replicate themselves in every way, but they do all the important things in a consistently similar way. They treat their plant as a money machine. It is only going to make money when the plant is running well. Their prime aim is to attain high plant availability at the right price. Each

Shutdown Management 149

proposal to shut down the plant or increase the frequency or duration of shutdowns is looked at from a hard-nosed business perspective.

This is their recipe.

Minimize the Need for Shutdowns

  • • They shut down only for good business reasons.
  • • No unthinking routines, no bad habits
  • • Flexibility of scope and timing is agreed with regulators
  • • They use unplanned stoppages as opportunities to do work.
  • • They pre-plan opportunity packages for fast activation
  • • Less tendency towards conservatism
  • • Reduced work scope of main shutdown
  • • They manage degradation.
  • • They buy decent equipment, configure it sensibly, operate and maintain it well
  • • Run the plant in a way that makes failure modes and rates predictable so inspection intervals can be confidently determined
  • • Eliminate failure causes by use of techniques like Root Cause Analysis
  • • Reliability is institutionalized (like safety)

Manage Regulators

  • • In the past, regulators often insisted on frequent shutdowns for internal inspections, which made decisions easy, but life expensive.
  • • Top performers demonstrate to the regulators that they manage a professional operation and gain control of all the factors.
  • • Decisions can then be business driven.
Risk-Based Inspection

Figure 19.3 Risk-Based Inspection

Effective Inspection Regimes

  • • The role of the inspector has changed from policeman to business partner. See Chapter 6.
  • • Use of Risk-Based Inspection to bring cost-effective inspection plans. See Figure 19.3.
  • • Production operates within agreed parameters and there is a joint management of degradation.
  • • Grasp opportunity windows to do necessary inspection work; increase use of non-intrusive inspection.

Avoid Expensive Shutdown Work

  • • It was once considered sensible to do work on a shutdown, as work could be planned, and skills, cranes, etc., made available.
  • • Studies now show that doing work on a shutdown is nearly 50% more expensive than single-focused jobs done on the run.
  • • Productivity also degrades when manpower is more than 700.

Have Small Shutdowns

  • • Do most work on the run.
  • • Use non-invasive inspection techniques.
  • • Focus on the critical business aspects.
  • • Have clear shutdown objectives as an effective work-filter.

Months before shutdown

Ongoing

Business

plan

24

18

12

6

0

1

S/D

concept

Preliminary

preparation

Detail

planning

Final

preparation

Execute

Post S/D

o Form

o Form steering

o Establish

o Challenge /

o Infrastruc-

o Manage changes

o Identify

steering

team

organization

Review risk

ture in place

о Close out tasks

lessons

groups

о Establish S/D

о Define/

о Establish S/D

о Scaffolding

о Report job

learned

о 10/5 year

purpose &

freeze 90%

work package

о Get permits

status

о Adjust

plan

objectives

scope

о Prepare S/D

о Contractor

о Monitor

strategy &

о Annual plan

о Make high

о Preliminary

schedule

induction

progress /

tactics

о Integrate

level work

critical path

о Make detail

о Contractor

Update plan

о Adjust

with projects

scope

о 20%

mini plans

training

о Monitor costs

procedures &

о Optimize

о Establish one

estimate

о Make 10%

о Allocate

о Write repair

mstruc-tions

timings

page

о Agree

budget

tasks

history

о Capital and

milestone plan

contract

о Prepare

о Mobilize

о Identify non

revenue

о Make 30%

type

management

supervision

conformances/

budgets

estimate &

o Start

instructions

о Audit

Incidents

о Why, what,

staffing

contract

о Establish HSE

material

о Commission

when and

о Decide

negotiations

instructions

supply

plant equipment

business

organization

о Develop

о Order

о Final

expecta-

structure

overall S/D

materials /

inspections

tions

о Initiate long

plan

services

confirm

delivery

о Establish

о Award

scope

procure-ments

detailed

contracts

milestones:

о Arrange

о QM plan

manuals /

drawings

Table 19.4 Business Processes of a Shutdown

These steps minimize shutdown complexity and competence demands. A small competent workforce brings:

  • • Quality work
  • • Equipment reliability
  • • Good communications
  • • Ownership and pride in workmanship
 
Source
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